"Vintage" Beads.

Q: What is considered "Vintage"? Something used before? Over a certain age? Something not produced anymore? There seems to be as many opinions as there are beads. Does adding vintage beads to a project increase it's value? Probably only to people who care about such things.

A: Now, I thought it was 75 years old to be antique. lol I'm not going to worry about it. I'll buy what beads I like if they're at the price I can afford. I have seen the term "vintage" used inappropriately by many bead and/or jewelry sellers, so this is definitely one of those instances of "buyer beware". Vintage beads should be at LEAST 50 years old, and antique beads should be at least 100 years old. I have seen beads from the 1960s and 1970s on auction listed as "vintage" - they would be more appropriately termed "retro." I once thought 60s would be considered vintage. Most of my beads range from the 20s to 50s. Is it something you researched, or is it your feeling on it? I do know for a fact that things have to be at least 100 years old to be considered an antique. I dislike the term "estate". Some folks use that line too much. Estate can be a piece purchased in 1998 by a person who then dies in 1999 and the items are then pieces from that person's estate. I used to sell antique fine jewelry and it just drove me crazy when they said that. Something not produced anymore? There seems to be as many opinions as there are beads. The "true" definition refers to the correct number of years old. Since I am never sure of this number (or the age of my beads!), I generally only use the term to refer to beads that are not produced anymore, and it does seem to impress my customers in general (for reference, my customers tend to be over 30, and college educated).