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  1. #11
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    Dec 2004
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    363
    Month by month my "What did you read list" has been steadily decreasing. I need to do something about that soon.

    In April I read:

    Alas, Babylon-Pat Frank (1 1/2 times)

    Blackbird House-Alice Hoffman (car trip, okay?)

    Summer Sisters-Judy Blume

    I need to get my hands on some more books and soon. I am read-deprived! I have even gone so far as to re-read every single Parenting magazine in my possession. I can't stand Parenting Magazine!!

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  3. #12
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    Jun 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by belleepoque
    This Rough Magic by Mary Stewart-- the 1964 edition with the original jacket i got for $1! .
    I am so jealous (warning thread hijack) It's really hard to find these, and I've spent usually in the $5-$7 range per a hardback. Do you think it is a problem that I seem to want to own all Mary Stewart's ouevre in orginal hardback? Much of what I own is in paperback, so now I'm buying them again in hardback. My favorites being this one and Wildfire at Midnight. Sorry, end highjack

    This month I also read:
    Jill Patton Walsh - A Desert in Bohemia. I love, love, love this book.
    Michael Chabon - The Amazing Adventures of Kavelier and Clay I love this one too, but it's sooo sad.
    Global Frequency (comic collected into a paperback)
    baby books (what to expect while expecting, the complete guide of pregnancy of childbirth)
    and some mysterys I can't really remember - something by Rita Mae Brown?

  4. #13
    Junior Member
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    Apr 2005
    Location
    England, UK
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    10
    My bookclub did Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo. It is a Young Adult novel, but so moving, so sad, so beautiful. It really moved us and made us think, but at the same time, we really enjoyed the book. Rare for us to find one that we all agree on!

  5. #14
    Member
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    Aug 2004
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    50
    I read Skinny Dip by Carl Hiassen. It was funny and light. I read Eats, Shoots and Leaves which was pretty good for a book about punctuation. I'm still reading Bowling Alone, which is a long hard slog, but is interesting enough to keep my attention (barely).

  6. #15
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    Apr 2005
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    NoCal
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    I was just thinking about a thread like this and schbam! Here it is.

    The Shelters of Stone - Jean M. Auel.
    This is the fourth in the Clan of the Cavebear series. I read the first three in high school and had no idea that she had continued the series until I ran into it at the library. It was as good as the others.

    Blackbird House - Alice Hoffman.
    The first of her novels I read was The Probable Future, and I really liked it. So, as is my habit once I read something I like, I read everything that has been written by said author. Her books take on a sameness sometimes, this was an example.

    The Mists of Avalon - Marion Zimmer Bradley.
    This was a re-read from when I was 14. I am now 30. This book is still as intriguing as it was to my young mind.

    The TIme Traveler's Wife - Audrey Niffenegger.
    This is one of the most captivating and emotional books I have read in a long time. I finished it in 2 days. I got the recommendation from this board. Thank You, I am still thinking about this book.

    The Bean Trees - Barbara Kingsolver.
    For some reason I always have just passed this author by. Also recommended by these boards, and I have to say... I really enjoyed it, enough to want to read more of her work.

    The Forest House - Marion Zimmer Bradley.
    This is the prequel to her staggering work The Mists of Avalon. If you have read TMoA, I recommend this book, it goes the beginning of the Roman invasion of Britain. There are other books in this series, I will read them all.

  7. #16
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    Jan 2005
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    Germany
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    Milan Kundera: The Book of Laughter and Forgetting - really awesome. Haven't read any Kundera before and felt it was really creatively brilliant. Like all these ideas he pushed out and played with so I saw them in all different ways. And I loved thinking about different types of laughter, and what forgetting can be and mean.

    Paul Auster, adapted by David Mazzuchelli and Paul Karasik: City of Glass - beautiful comic book. Drew me in but I kept expecting some more tricksy plot, and then bam it just ended and I felt weirdly stunned.

    Haruki Murakami: The Elephant Vanishes - (Only halfway through!) A collection of short stories with that funny mix of bizarreness (monsters emerging from grass and crazy midnight raids on MacDonalds) and mundanity - I like the way he writes really little details. I really like Murakami, but this hasn't captivated me like Norwegian Wood did.


    Feeling quite inspired by all your reads. Will have to check out that Pox Americana book brdgt listed - I miss reading history. Did History of Medicine master's but didn't really cover America at all, so that would be new. Think I will have to get Persepolis also - looks awesome, and am getting much more into comics now.

  8. #17
    Senior Member
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    Apr 2004
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    Wisconsin
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    1,563
    Quote Originally Posted by little my
    Feeling quite inspired by all your reads. Will have to check out that Pox Americana book brdgt listed - I miss reading history. Did History of Medicine master's but didn't really cover America at all, so that would be new.
    Where did you do your degree? I'm in the University of Wisconsin's History of Science and Medicine graduate program right now :)

    I read Milan Kundera's Immortality for book club last year and loved it.

  9. #18
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    Jan 2005
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    Germany
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    Quote Originally Posted by brdgt
    Where did you do your degree? I'm in the University of Wisconsin's History of Science and Medicine graduate program right now :)
    I did mine at the London Centre for History of Science, Technology and Medicine (which comprises the Wellcome Trust; University College London; Imperial College London and The Science Museum)

    I actually did MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine, which was good, but they set up an MA History of Medicine only the year after I left, which would have been much better for me.

    Are you going to go on and be an academic? I couldn't hack it, but I did love the subject. Think I might go back and do something similar one day. Hope you're enjoying your degree :)

  10. #19
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    Wisconsin
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    Quote Originally Posted by little my
    Quote Originally Posted by brdgt
    Where did you do your degree? I'm in the University of Wisconsin's History of Science and Medicine graduate program right now :)
    I did mine at the London Centre for History of Science, Technology and Medicine (which comprises the Wellcome Trust; University College London; Imperial College London and The Science Museum)

    I actually did MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine, which was good, but they set up an MA History of Medicine only the year after I left, which would have been much better for me.

    Are you going to go on and be an academic? I couldn't hack it, but I did love the subject. Think I might go back and do something similar one day. Hope you're enjoying your degree :)
    Awesome, we have a visiting fellow right now from Warwick :)

    I plan on being a professor, although since I focus on public health there are other options - but I like teaching. I started in US history and didn't get into any programs the first time around and then got into almost all of them the second time around, including my first choice, UW :)

  11. #20
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    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    76
    Quote Originally Posted by dalva

    Blackbird House - Alice Hoffman.
    The first of her novels I read was The Probable Future, and I really liked it. So, as is my habit once I read something I like, I read everything that has been written by said author. Her books take on a sameness sometimes, this was an example.

    .

    I'm reading Blackbird House now - actually I started to during a trip and haven't gotten back to it. I liked what I read, but it hasn't capitvated me (if it had I wouldn't have been able to put it down). I'm not sure if I can tell if you liked it or ultimately found it to be to much of the same theme. Or if you just liked the other one much more.

    The Time Traveler's Wife is on a list for me too.


 
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