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  1. #1
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    What did you read in April 2005?

    Alas, I thought I would be reading more this month, with three paper due and all, but so much of it ended up being articles.

    In April I read:

    Eragon by Christopher Paolini HATED it, hated it, hated it. A poorly written imitative work.

    Seers of God: Puritan Providentialism in the Restoration and Early Enlightenment by Michael P. Winship Finally a good book on the Puritans. Not only do I finally get Puritan theology but the book really explains the mood of the era in both the colonies and England.

    Pox Americana: The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82 by Elizabeth A. Fenn Second time reading this one, its wonderful, I cant recommend it enough, to historians as well as anyone interested in American history and the history of disease. The key point Smallpox has no animal vector, therefore wherever it appeared you can trace human contact, hence defining what was America in 1782.

    Foundation by Isaac Asimov I was raised on cyberpunk and feminist science fiction/fantasy so I thought this would be a good way to branch out and sample the "Golden Age." An incredibly intelligent book, I will be reading the rest of the series.

    Tales from Fishcamp by Danielle Henderson Danielle is a friend of mine I met on Livejournal and this is a hilarious non-fiction account of her job at a fish camp in Alaska.

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  3. #2
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    I read:

    Princess in Training by Meg Cabot

    I love my YA lit, and I especially love Michael Moscovitz.

    Burnt Bread and Chutney: A Memoir of an Indian Jewish Childhood by Carmit Delman

    I also love memoirs. This one had a really interesting premise (which is an awful word, because it's nonfiction), but I didn't like it as much as I thought I would.

    A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers

    I wear a studded belt and ironic t-shirts, and keep my iPod in my messenger bag. As such, this was required reading. I liked it a lot, even though it had a few slow parts.

  4. #3
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    this was a mind-blowingly book-full month, you can tell:

    * Maus I and Maus II by Art Spiegelman
    * Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi
    * The! Greatest! of! Marlys! by Lynda Barry

    all comics. all GREAT. I just haven't felt like reading much lately, and probably won't read much more than fluff until vacation. I've read a lot of magazines lately, though.

  5. #4
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    This Rough Magic by Mary Stewart-- the 1964 edition with the original jacket i got for $1! good old fashioned chick reading

    P.S. by Helen Schulman- 40-something woman meets a younger man who seems to be a doppelganger for her first love who died at 20. concept=cool, execution=eh.

    Yoga for People Who Can't Be Bothered etc. -- I expected these essays to be hilarious, but was a bit disappointed.

    James Patterson's First to Die and Second Chance, both 1-day read brain candy thrillers.

    I know there are more but I can't think of them now...

  6. #5
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    Just about to finish Death of an Ordinary Man by Glen Duncan.

    I've also looked through about 30 different craft books from the library getting ideas and learning how to knit, but I won't count those. :)

    I usually read a lot more - I've been doing so much stuff though I'm actually TIRED when I go to bed...which is just about the only time I read - before I go to sleep or when I wake up if I don't have to get up for anything.

  7. #6
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    Woo hoo! I've been waiting for this thread. School holidays meant a book-filled April for me:

    The Bride Stripped Bare by Nikki Gemmell. Created something of an uproar on it's publication because it was originally credited as 'anonymous'. I really liked this one - it's about a new marriage, relationships, sex and dissatisfaction.

    My Brilliant Career by Miles Franklin. First published in 1901, authored by a teenaged Australian girl. Follows the trials and tribulations of a girl wanting to rise above the expectations and plans of her family and late 1800's society. Now I want to name my first daughter Sybylla and I'm keen to see the movie based on the book, starring Judy Davis.

    Sea Glass by Anita Shreve. I finished this one in an afternoon and a night. Consuming, but a confronting end.

    The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory. I really got into this. It's the story of the changes instigated in the English Court at the time of Anne Boleyn, told through the eyes of her sister Mary.

    The Porno Girl: and Other Stories by Merin Wexler. I read bits and pieces of this. It was OK. Lots of creative, descriptive passages.

    And my book of the month:

    The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. Recommended by the Getcrafty bookworms, excellent & very thought-provoking.

  8. #7
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    In April I read two books I will discuss and a couple of paperback romance novels. I can't get away from my brain's junk food! Anyway,
    I read:

    Bel Canto - Ann Patchett - I had danced around this book at the store for a really long time. After reading some of the getcrafty posts I decided to go for it. Overall I thought it was good, but I think I expected more from it.

    The Drowning Tree - Carol Goodman - This book is written in first person and it is about a woman in her thirties making her way through life when all sorts of things from her past resurface and need attention. I like the "okay, I guess I'll deal with this now" attitude of the main character. She is practical, yet allows herself to dream and very human. I enjoy Carol Goodman's books.

  9. #8
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    I read the first two books of the Narnia series: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, and Prince Caspian. Both good fast reads. I still have the other five books to get through (reading them all in a row is a bit overwhelming).

    I also read Watership Down, by Richard Adams. I really liked it! My favorite part was the names of all the rabbits, especially Haystack (who, sadly, didn't have much of a role in the story).

    Now I am starting The Handmaid's Tale after reading so many positive getcrafty posts about it. In fact, today is cold and rainy, which is perfect for curling up on the couch and reading the afternoon away...

  10. #9
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    I only had time to read one book this whole month, but it's become my favorite book of all time. Extremely Loud, and Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safron Foer. I can't even try to sum it up, because it's so many things in one. Go read it.

  11. #10
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    It was a slow book month for me since I had read a horribly depressing book at the end of March that turned me off for awhile.

    April's books were:
    Persepolis 2 by Marjane Satrapi, the follow up to Persepolis which I was very eager to read. Great, sad, moving.

    Prep by Curtis Sittenfield. Follows the life of a girl in a private school from grades 9 through 12. The author is local so there was a lot of noise about it -- some of it I thought a little over the top. I wasn't impressed.

    Maybe Baby by Tenaya Darlington. Thought provoking story about an older couple who are estranged from their adult children, one of which is pregnant and planning to raise their baby in a gender free community. The book deals with how the family fell apart and how the parents react to their daughter's alternative lifestyle choice for herself and their grandchild. Interesting, but I wasn't sure what message the author was trying to push by the end.

    Our Cancer Year by Joyce Brabner. I was a great fan of the film American Splender and this graphic novel by Harvey Pekar's wife depicts the year Harvey was diagnosed with cancer. I was pleasantly surprised with this one, thinking that the book would be consumed with the cancer and be following Harvey, but the book seems more centered around Joyce's life and how other things going on that year (such as Dessert Storm) effected her and the work she was doing with teens from other countries.


 
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