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  1. #11
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    I read: American Purgatorio by John Haskell--a man walks out of a convenience store to discover that his wife (and life) has vanished.
    All in my Head by Paula Kamen--a memoir of a writer's struggles with a unrelenting, years-long head-ache. Skipped parts of this one since it was very medical.
    Gemma Bovery by Posy Simmonds--a graphic novel modern-day treatment of the classic Madame Bovary
    Eyeing the Flash-The Education of a Carnival Con Artist by Peter Fenton--the author's experiences of being a grifter in a traveling carnival. I knew carnival games were crooked--but this explains just how crooked!
    The Year of Pleasures by Elizbeth Berg--enjoyable reading candy

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by soapandwater
    Conflicting reviews? I wonder what could have been said about it.
    I think the not-so-hot review was in EW, so I probly should have taken that into consideration in the first place . . . it said something like it didn't live up to the potential of the Persepolis books. something along those lines. so I was wary because I've REALLY enjoyed those and didn't want to be disappointed. but I trust your judgment more than EW's, heh.

    oh, and CraftinFool, have you read Ann Patchett's Truth and Beauty, about her friendship with Grealy? I can't remember if you've mentioned it or not.

  4. #13
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    Oct 2004
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    The Jane Austen Book Club by Karen Joy Fowler-- i liked it just fine, but LOVED her others (sister noon and sarah canary)

    Alamo House by Sarah Bird, darling, fun, funny-- anyone read the yakota officer's club? is it good?

    The Egyptologist by Arthur Phillips-- couldn't put it down. amazing that he wrote Prague and also this UTTERLY different period piece-- an epistolary psychological mystery.

    and lots of Michael Connolly, Nora Roberts, Harlan Coben and Mary Higgins Clark as bus-ride brain candy. can't even remember the titles!

  5. #14
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    The Notebook Nicholas Sparks.
    It felt incomplete to me, as though it was going to be something else. I never really felt the characters.

    The Golden Compass Phillip Pullman.
    I picked this up upon recommendation of someone on this board. Thanks!!
    I was dragging my mental feet on this one until around page 87, then it became an engrossing imaginative world. I really enjoyed it. I am actually picking up the second book at the library today. I'm pleased to see YA books of this nature being written.

    The Namesake Jhumpa Lahiri.
    This is the first Indian author that I have read, and I loved it. The main character is male, and the author is female which I always find amazing, especially when done really well as in Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden, and She's Come Undone - Wally Lamb (except those are examples of male authors and female characters). This novel has definitely increased my interest in Indian Writers.

    Lady of Avalon Marion Zimmer Bradley.
    One in the Mists of Avalon series. This is strangely squished. It is in three parts, covering hundreds and hundreds of years. Usually she is super detailed, this one was like a bridge, I guess. I did like it, but I wouldn't recommend it unless you are already intrenched in the story by having read The Mists of Avalon.

    Pigs in Heaven Barbara Kingsolver.
    I love Barbara Kingsolver. This was a continuation of The Bean Trees and the second of her novels that I have read. I will read them all.

    Bel Canto Ann Patchett.
    I just began this a few days ago, so I really haven't formulated any opinions as of yet. I borrowed it upon recommendation from these boards, so far no one here as steered me wrong, so I have faith this will be a great book.

    Happy Reading!!

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by dalva
    The Golden Compass Phillip Pullman.
    I picked this up upon recommendation of someone on this board. Thanks!!
    I was dragging my mental feet on this one until around page 87, then it became an engrossing imaginative world. I really enjoyed it. I am actually picking up the second book at the library today. I'm pleased to see YA books of this nature being written.
    Once you are done with the Dark Materials trilogy check out The Abhorsen Trilogy, another high quality young adult fantasy series.

  7. #16
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    Apr 2004
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    I'm happy other people read and enjoyed books I've loved in the past, like Pigs in Heaven (maybe my best high school reading assignment), The Perks of Being a Wallflower, and The Partly Cloudy Patriot. Sarah Vowell was one of the only things I liked about The Incredibles.

    Anyway, this month I read:

    A Round-Heeled Woman by Jane Juska. It's a memoir by a woman who placed an ad in the New York Times Review of Books or something like that, saying that she wanted to have lots of sex before her 60th birthday. All the stuff about the guys who respond to her ad are interesting, but Juska has also worked as an English teacher, and all the things she had to say about her love affair with words got to me a lot more.

    Flophouse: Life on the Bowery by Dave Isay, Stacy Abramson, and Harvey Wang. It was kind of a cheater book, as it's just as much photography as it is text. These three spent a bunch of time on the flophouses (hotels that are about $10 or less a night) on the Bowery in NYC, talking to people about why they were there. It was fascinating. There's also a piece archived on NPR (I think it was Fresh Air?) about the manager of the Sunshine Hotel. It's also really good, and worth your time if you've got 25 minutes to kill and don't want to read the book.

    and Bachelor Girl: The Secret History of Single Women in the Twentieth Century by Betsy Israel. Pretty self-explanatory. It's interesting to see how much has changed, and how much hasn't changed, in the last 100 years.

    Right now I'm in the middle of Fear of Flying, which I feel is part of my womanly duty to read.

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by brdgt
    Quote Originally Posted by dalva
    The Golden Compass Phillip Pullman.
    I picked this up upon recommendation of someone on this board. Thanks!!
    I was dragging my mental feet on this one until around page 87, then it became an engrossing imaginative world. I really enjoyed it. I am actually picking up the second book at the library today. I'm pleased to see YA books of this nature being written.
    Once you are done with the Dark Materials trilogy check out The Abhorsen Trilogy, another high quality young adult fantasy series.
    I wholeheartedly second this recommendation!

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by athena
    Quote Originally Posted by brdgt
    Quote Originally Posted by dalva
    The Golden Compass Phillip Pullman.
    I picked this up upon recommendation of someone on this board. Thanks!!
    I was dragging my mental feet on this one until around page 87, then it became an engrossing imaginative world. I really enjoyed it. I am actually picking up the second book at the library today. I'm pleased to see YA books of this nature being written.
    Once you are done with the Dark Materials trilogy check out The Abhorsen Trilogy, another high quality young adult fantasy series.
    I wholeheartedly second this recommendation!
    Thank you both for the recommendation. I just added it to the ever lengthening list of books to read.

    I love you all bookworms!!

  10. #19
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    Jan 2005
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    Rochester, NY
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    I've been reading the John Dunning "Bookman" series...pretty good so far. If you love books, AND you love mysteries, you'll like these stories. I have a couple new mysteries all waiting to be read -- Ace Atkins Dirty South and Robert Crais' new one, The Forgotten Man. I'm reading the Uninvited Countess right now...part of the "Jazz Age" series by Michael Kilian. I expect I'll be over this mystery phase soon. Am eagerly awaiting the Harry Potter....

    P

  11. #20
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    Aug 2004
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    Ohio
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    I am really proud of myself this last month because I have read a lot of books. Nevermind if a lot of them are children's books I read in an afternoon, it's still an accomplishment!
    The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan: I really loved it. It was really interesting as kind of a history book, to know exactly how women lived and thought back then, and to compare it to women's experiences in more recent history.
    Autobiography of a Fat Bride by Laurie Notaro: I think this might be my favorite one of hers. It was funny and quick to read.
    The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery: I'm trying to read all the classic children's literature that I missed out on while I was reading Babysitter's Club Books in elementary school and this is one of them. I adored it. Supercute.
    Over Sea, Under Stone by Susan Cooper: This is the first book in a series of children's books called The Dark is Rising that my boyfriend introduced me to. This one is a lot more kidsy than the first one I read and I didn't like it anywhere near as much, but it wasn't bad.
    The Miserable Mill, The Austere Academy, and The Ersatz Elevator by Lemony Snickett: Someone on this board once said the Series of Unfortunate Events books keep getting progressively better, and she was absolutely right.
    Maus I and Maus II by Art Spiegelman: Really beautiful graphic novels about the author's father's experiences as a Jew in Europe during World War II. I like how it's not only about his father during the War, but also about the son interviewing his father and their relationship, which makes it different from all the other survivor stories out there.
    I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith: Holy crap, this book was great. Very clever and witty and SO GOOD!
    Greenwitch by Susan Cooper: The third Dark is Rising book--better than the first, not as good as the second. The more the book talks about the Old Ones and the Dark, the better.


 
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