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  1. #11
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    I first read Zilpha Keatley Snyder's Green-Sky trilogy in 6th grade, and I still re-read it every few years. The books are Below the Root, And All Between, and Until the Celebration. Obscure and almost certainly out of print, but worth reading if you can find them.

    Her earlier book The Changeling is a good read too - it's a more true-to-life story whose characters play a fantasy game that's the basis for the Green-Sky world.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dalva
    Anything by Francesca Lia Block. I read nearly all of her books a few years ago, and would have loved them as YAF.
    Agreed - much love for Francesca, but I don't think any of her other work has held up as well as the Weetzie Bat books, especially Witch Baby and Baby Be-bop.

    Other YA that I think adults would like:
    *The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
    *This Lullaby by Sarah Dessen
    *Born Confused by Tanuja Desai Hidier
    *Hope Was Here by Joan Bauer
    *True Confessions of a Heartless Girl by Martha Brooks
    *The Year of Secret Assignments by Jaclyn Moriarty
    *A Solitary Blue by Cynthia Voigt
    *Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine - it is sooooooo much better than the movie

    And some good books intended for younger kids:
    *The Ordinary Princess by M. M. Kaye - utterly delightful and finally back in print!
    *The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis
    *The Time Quartet series by Madeleine L'Engle
    *The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
    *The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo - if this book doesn't make you cry, you're made of sterner stuff than I am
    *The Happy Hocky Family by Lane Smith - it's HILARIOUS!
    *What a Truly Cool World by Julius Lester

    Alison, high school librarian who took her time responding to this thread because she figured she'd get carried away, and, well, you can see she did

  4. #13
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    I have to shout YES! about Philip Pullman's Dark Materials trilogy.

    Marjorie Furlong's books Juniper and Wise Child are also perennial.

    I love getting away into E. Nesbit's world.

    And Linnets and Valerians by Elizabeth Goudge is also great.

    L.M. Boston's Children of Green Knowe series.

    Joan Aiken and her Dido Twite series. Plus Wolves of Willoughby Chase. YES Yes Yes! These books put Lemony Snicket and his pretentiousness to shame. If you want a REAL series of unfortunate events involving characters you can care about, read Joan Aiken.

    I cannot forget to mention David Almond, who wrote Skellig and especially, Kit's Wilderness. The latter knocked me out it was SO GOOD. I need to buy a copy of this book to sit next to Philip Pullman. Deep.

    I recently read a book called Slake's Limbo which was great. (don't know the author.)

    The Diddikoi by Rumer Godden.

    The Giver by Lois Lowry, too.

    The Earthsea Trilogy by Ursula K. LeGuin. I don't know if they are intended for kids but that is when I read them.

    For quick amusement, I read Jerry Spinelli's books for YA. Loser, Stargirl, Maniac MacGee. They give me something to think about for awhile, but I don't think they are forever kind of books.

    I will try to think of books that don't hold up for me...
    Alice's adventure's in Wonderland is probably one of those. I worshipped that book when I was young, and I think that last time I read it, I found the main character so annoying. Through the Looking Glass is still awesome for me. It is darker somehow.

  5. #14
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    It will be interesting to see if "current classics" like The Dark Materials Trilogy do hold up in ten or twenty years.

  6. #15
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    true enough.
    I know a lot of people still swear by A Wrinkle in Time...

    it has a moral character that is entirely different from the Pullman trilogy. I don't know if the quasi-heretical thinking (I really don't know what to call it. Post-modern? probably not...) Pullman is putting forth there will seem dated.
    But maybe that is not the kind of holding up you are talking about?


    I love talking about children's lit!

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by redheadedali
    Alison, high school librarian who took her time responding to this thread because she figured she'd get carried away, and, well, you can see she did
    Alison, I'm so glad you DID get carried away. I'm printing this list out! go-fish's, too!

    :-)

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by go-fish
    true enough.
    I know a lot of people still swear by A Wrinkle in Time...

    it has a moral character that is entirely different from the Pullman trilogy. I don't know if the quasi-heretical thinking (I really don't know what to call it. Post-modern? probably not...) Pullman is putting forth there will seem dated.
    But maybe that is not the kind of holding up you are talking about?


    I love talking about children's lit!
    I love The Dark Materials Trilogy but I could see it seeming very heavy handed in a decade or so. I think by "holding up" I mean several things - like, in hindsight does it seem over-the-top, as well as, does it seem dated. To me, A Wrinkle in Time was dated. I was really bothered by the gender stereotypes in it. And then there is that sort of intagible "I loved it as a kid, but now I don't see what I saw in it" sort of thing.

  9. #18
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    mm, good lists everyone's posted.

    I have to add The Little Prince. I tried to use it as an analysis piece in high school, but the teacher wouldn't allow it because she said it was a "children's book, and not serious enough". I disagree.

  10. #19
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    I don't know how young we're talking here, but I would say everything by Judy Blume for young adults.

  11. #20
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    I have a small collection of Children's/Y.A. books and love rereading them. What was really cool, was a couple of years ago I was cleaning out some old boxes and found a list of books that I had read in elementary school. My teacher made us write down the book, author, # of pages, etc.

    Some of my favorites (new and old)

    -Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
    -The entire collection by Linda Lewis (2 Young 2 Go 4 Boys, We Hate Everything But Boys, Is there life after boys?, etc). I used to read the entire series every summer before I started the next school year. These are great growing-up books for girls.
    -Little House on the Prarie series
    -Harry Potter series (although I'm only through 3 of them)


 
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