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  1. #21
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    For some reason, lately I've grown more interested in YA fiction, both that I read in the past and new works. I have to second Francesa Lia Block (reading her fiction is like floating) and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Series. I also loved Judy Blume, especially Romana Quimby. I also recommend The Boxcar children series, A Series of Unforunate Events series, And the Artemis Fowl series. I also love Wayside School series.

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  3. #22
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    Dec 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyhats
    For some reason, lately I've grown more interested in YA fiction, both that I read in the past and new works. I have to second Francesa Lia Block (reading her fiction is like floating) and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Series. I also loved Judy Blume, especially Romana Quimby. I also recommend The Boxcar children series, A Series of Unforunate Events series, And the Artemis Fowl series. I also love Wayside School series.
    I loved the Wayside School series but could never get into the "Boxcar Children". Does anyone else remember ordering from the Troll Book Club at school? My mother would spend a good $100 on books for both of us (English isn't her first language and like we've been discussing there are a lot of kid's books that are good).

    My favorite Ramona books were Ramona Quimbly, Age 8 and Ramona Forever.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by brdgt
    It will be interesting to see if "current classics" like The Dark Materials Trilogy do hold up in ten or twenty years.
    I think His Dark Materials will "hold up." Even though it contains a lot of "heavy" material it's still wrapped beautifully in an enjoyable story. Personally, I don't think his message on religion is something that's going to be dated eventually--particularly if the religious Right is able to hold on to the power they have in the US. Other themes are timeless, like love and the power of friendship, and what it means to grow up.

    Holes by Louis Sachar is an incredible YA book. Also (sorry if I'm doubling what anyone else said):
    Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
    Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli
    Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech
    Tangerine by Edward Bloor
    Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

  5. #24
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    Pennsylvania
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    I second The Chronicles of Narnia and also suggest The Hobbit. I didn't really care for The Lord of the Rings (too much fighting and stuff, I get bored) but I LOVE The Hobbit. I read it so many times when I was a kid, I had to get a librarian to glue my copy back together because the spine was totally shot. Since I left that copy during a move, I haven't had a chance to re-read it though.

  6. #25
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    Personally I still love the Giving Tree, although it's much too short to listen too. Is the Cather in the Rye considered a YA? I really loved that book and I dont usually like YA.

  7. #26
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    Oct 2005
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    I loved Number the Stars when i was in middle school. Also The Upstairs Room. For recent YA, i really like the books by Sarah Dessen. And Harry Potter of course.

  8. #27
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    Jul 2005
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    Dorrie the Witch is still my favorite childrens book. Dorrie and the Witches Camp is probably my favorite of the series. The 60's illustrations are quirky and her cat Gink is the cutest.

  9. #28
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    Jan 2005
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    13
    Quote Originally Posted by brdgt
    Quote Originally Posted by smachel
    i agree about to kill a mockingbird -- i don't consider that YA.
    Weird, am I the only one who had to read it in junior high???
    I read it in jr. high but also read Hemingway, Jane Austen, Flaubert, etc. back then because the classics were a part of the curriculum. I've recently reread some of the classics I'd read as a school girl and they definitely went over my head back then! Although I did appreciate them (for the most part) I didn't "get" so much!

  10. #29
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    Aug 2006
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    43
    This is my mile long list:

    Diana Wynne Jones:
    About 50% of what she writes is GREAT! These are my favorites.
    Howl's Moving Castle
    The Lives of Christopher Chant
    Archer's Goon
    The Spellcoats
    The Crown of Dalemark
    A Tale of Time City
    The Ogre Downstairs


    E. Nesbit:
    Everything, of course!

    Joan Aiken:
    All the Wolves Chronicles, no matter how creepy, plus The Cockatrice Boys.

    Arthur Ransome:
    The Swallows and Amazons books from The Swallows and Amazons to The Picts and the Martyrs.

    Monica Furlong:
    Wise Child
    Juniper
    Cormac was unsatisfactory.

    L.M. Boston:
    The Green Knowe books.

    J.R.R. Tolkein:
    The Hobbit. Sometimes I get this off the shelf, and read the chapter, Riddles In The Dark over and over.
    The Lord of the Rings trilogy.

    Susan Cooper:
    Over Sea, Under stone
    The Dark is Rising
    Greenwitch
    The Grey King
    Silver On The Tree

    The His Dark Materials trilogy, by Philip Pullman, definitely.

    The Giver, by Lois Lowry, it's really disturbing, but it's really good.

    Linnets and Valerians, Elizabeth Goudge.

    Inkheart and Inkspell, by Cornelia Funke, are really good. I should read them again.....

  11. #30
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    Apr 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by little_farm_girl
    Susan Cooper:
    Over Sea, Under stone
    The Dark is Rising
    Greenwitch
    The Grey King
    Silver On The Tree
    i just read this series, and i can attest to its "holding up." it was really great!


 
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