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  1. #1
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    Children's/YA books that hold up?

    I'm big on books on tape and I really like Young Adult and children's books on tape. This year I've reread a couple of "classics" - Bridge to Terebithia and A Wrinkle in Time.

    It's funny, Bridge to Terebithia really held up, it was still believable, sort of timeless, and darn it if I didn't cry at the end. I just finished A Wrinkle In Time and had the exact opposite experience, I didn't think it held up at all and the main character really bothered me, especially as a role model for little girls. All she does is whine and demand people help her.

    Last year I read To Kill A Mockingbird again and was blown away. It was so good I almost felt it had been wasted on me as a child and reading it as an adult added so much more meaning.

    So what children's books hold up for you? What ones don't?

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  3. #2
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    i don't think of _To Kill a Mockingbird_ as youth literature, myself. it's one of my favorite books, and i did love it as a kid, but there's a whole layer of meaning i didn't "get" when i was young.

    i still love the Redwall series by Brian Jacques, and all of the Laura Ingalls Wilder stories.

    i was really into YA and adult fantasy when i was in the 8-12 range, and that stuff definitely does not hold up.

  4. #3
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    YA books

    I have read and really like The Giver by Lois Lowry and all the georgia Nicholson series. I hear those will be movies sometime soon. I hope they hold up!

  5. #4
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    Re: Children's/YA books that hold up?

    Quote Originally Posted by brdgt
    Last year I read To Kill A Mockingbird again and was blown away. It was so good I almost felt it had been wasted on me as a child and reading it as an adult added so much more meaning.
    Quote Originally Posted by stella
    i don't think of _To Kill a Mockingbird_ as youth literature, myself. it's one of my favorite books, and i did love it as a kid, but there's a whole layer of meaning i didn't "get" when i was young.
    I just read this for the first time ever, and I was blown away, too. I think if I had read it when I was younger, I would have missed all of the important themes.

    A series I love that I think may be wasted on kids is the His Dark Materials Trilogy by Philip Pullman. There are so many "adult" themes (and I don't mean sex, I mean big picture issues--religion, coming of age, autonomy, etc.) I just wouldn't have understood (much less noticed).

  6. #5
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    to me, the berenstain bears series is still good. what great children's books.

    as far as YA, i'm not really sure...

    i agree about to kill a mockingbird -- i don't consider that YA.

  7. #6
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    Anything by Francesca Lia Block. I read nearly all of her books a few years ago, and would have loved them as YAF.

    When I was a kid, I read whatever I could get my hands on, which meant reading my mom's book collection. Sacajewa, Clan of the Cave Bear, etc. Books which could have been considered "too advanced" for a 5th grade reader. Relating to the point that Athena made, I think that things that aren't relevent to our life experience at certain ages is just fine. I think that His Dark Materials would have been just as entertaining, it just wouldn't have the depth of seriousness to a young mind as an adult mind. Does that make sense?

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dalva
    Relating to the point that Athena made, I think that things that aren't relevent to our life experience at certain ages is just fine. I think that His Dark Materials would have been just as entertaining, it just wouldn't have the depth of seriousness to a young mind as an adult mind. Does that make sense?
    Absolutely! I would have definitely enjoyed the adventure of the story if I had read it at a young age.

    (I was 26 when it was first published, so it's kind of a moot point for me. Ha! Even at 26, I think I maybe would have missed a lot. I didn't read it until I was 33, and everything I had read and experienced between those times really gave me the knowledge and background to really "get it.")

    ETA: And I love the way he uses the English language.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by smachel
    i agree about to kill a mockingbird -- i don't consider that YA.
    Weird, am I the only one who had to read it in junior high???

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by brdgt
    Weird, am I the only one who had to read it in junior high???
    I read it in junior high, but by choice, not because it was school-commanded. but for some reason I've always thought of it as YA too. my mom recommended it to me -- maybe she considered it YA and so I just assumed it was?

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by athena
    Quote Originally Posted by dalva
    Relating to the point that Athena made, I think that things that aren't relevent to our life experience at certain ages is just fine. I think that His Dark Materials would have been just as entertaining, it just wouldn't have the depth of seriousness to a young mind as an adult mind. Does that make sense?
    Absolutely! I would have definitely enjoyed the adventure of the story if I had read it at a young age.

    (I was 26 when it was first published, so it's kind of a moot point for me. Ha! Even at 26, I think I maybe would have missed a lot. I didn't read it until I was 33, and everything I had read and experienced between those times really gave me the knowledge and background to really "get it.")

    ETA: And I love the way he uses the English language.
    I agree!!
    I really enjoyed the idea that he put across as a sort of universal -conciousness


 
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