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  1. #11
    Senior Member
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    Oct 2004
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    San Francisco
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    697
    i love these threads, and i wish i was better at keeping track of what i read in an organized fashion. I'll give it a go:

    Sorcery and Cecelia, or The Enchanted Chocolate Pot by Wrede & Stevermier- hurrah for YA fiction!

    The Alchemist's Door by Lisa Goldstein

    The Mysteries by Lisa Tuttle

    Rose Daughter, Beauty and The Door in the Hedge by Robin McKinley

    The Murders of Richard III, The Street of Five moons and and an Amelia Peabody mystery by Elizabeth Peters

    As you see, it was a month for fantasy and mystery on my bedside. I went to grad school for English and have worked with books my entire career, but I feel only happiness when I contemplate my next batch of genre novels! Though I am starting to think I should throw in some classics and a bit more "heavy going" every now and then...

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  3. #12
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    Apr 2004
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    belleville, nj
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    467
    finished the courage to be rich, suze orman. still on the debt elimination stage and will be for a while. sigh.

    continued reading the spontaneous fulfillment of desire: harnessing the infinite power of coincidence, deepak chopra. this is a re-read. reading his stuff just makes me calm about life, and this book is very interesting. it also has the best explanation of a "higher power" (i.e., not the traditional religious explanation) and humans' connection to that.

    read the geographer's library, jon fasman. i liked it. i think i had higher expectations from review i've read. it was good. i felt kind of neutral to the characters and their plights. it is very well-written, but i guess it left me a little cold. i was looking to be swept up in the story.

    read blink: the power of thinking without thining, malcolm gladwell. i love malcolm! another great book that makes me look at myself, other people, and the world in a new way. and he is finally blogging! ([ur]http://gladwell.typepad.com/gladwellcom/[/url])

    started the slow down diet: eating for pleasure, energy, and weight loss, marc david. verrrryyyy interesting. looking at nutrition from a different angle than other diet books.

    this is my favorite thread on get crafty. :-)

  4. #13
    Senior Member
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    Mar 2006
    Location
    atlanta ga
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    433
    i forgot to add another book that i finished in february - Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides, who is also the author of the Virgin Suicides. this was a great book, very different and well written.

  5. #14
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2005
    Location
    New York state
    Posts
    189
    oh Middlesex is a great book. i never the virgin suicides but i love the movie.

  6. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    4
    I was actually able to finish a few in Feb - and I would recommend these three:

    1) The Kite Runner - a really engaging fictional history of contemporary Afghan refugees
    2) A Mixture of Fralities - a good substitute for a Jane Austen fix
    3) The Impossible Will Take Awhile - something to get you inspired to live the life you believe in and have hope for positive change (although it was somewhat tedious reading/took a while to officially finish)

  7. #16
    Senior Member
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    Mar 2006
    Location
    atlanta ga
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    433
    The Kite Runner is on my list, has been for a while. I need to hit the library - i have been swept away by borders gift cards lately - that time of year! :)

  8. #17
    Senior Member
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    Mar 2006
    Location
    atlanta ga
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    433
    Tootsiecat - thank you for posting about the winner of the national book award. I was going to read it but now it is not so high priority.

  9. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    18

    Books Books Books!

    Conversation # 1 & #2
    seem to be little comic book experiements, initiated by James Kochalka. #1 is with Craig Thompson, #2 is with Jeffery Brown. Both very philosophical, worth checking out especially if you are a comic fan- neat use of the medium. I'm sure others will appear.

    East is East by TC Boyle
    I fell in love with TC Boyle's short stories and this is the first novel of his that I've read. I am always impressed by his ability to capture these unique and yet also mundane characters. This book's central character is a selfish, manipulative, and yet somehow still endearing and above all human young writer woman. Worth reading.

    Drop City by TC Boyle
    This one is really good too. Everyone in this book is just trying to get away from it all- up in the wilds of Alaska. But of course you can never really get away from the ever-present dramas of life . . .

    Carnet de Voyage by Craig Thompson
    Worth reading, but not as good as his books- I am a huge fan of Goodbye Chunky Rice- so all you folks that had this or Blankets on your list last week, check out Goodbye Chunky Rice. It was his first book, and is more a fable than a real life narrative like the other two. But maybe I am just partial to fables and fairy tales.

    Magic for Beginners Short Stories by Kelly Link
    Great. All vaguely bizzare.

    The Complete Stories of Truman Capote

    Here They Come by Yannick Murphy
    I really enjoyed this book. Not a read it all at once type book. Centers on a young girl and her family- very poor- in new york city in the seventies. Left a sad taste in my mouth, not because the whole book was sad but the last few pages had a sad moment that stayed with me. It's McSweeney's book of the month (I just joined the club).

    Case Histories by Kate Atkinson
    This was really great. The clerk at one of my favorite bookstores recommended it (Blue Hill Books in Maine). Part novel/family stories and part crime/mystery novel. well-planned out and very clever (but not too clever).

  10. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    new york, new york
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    17

    Books I read in February

    Middlesex-Jeffrey Eugenides- amazing

    The Mermaid Chair- Sue Monk Kidd--not my top choice.

    My Sister's Keeper- Jodie Piccoult--i loved the book until the end...i hated HATED the ending.

    Night- Ellie Weisel--truly heartwrenching

    Angels & Demons- Dan Brown--i was every bit as enthralled with this novel as i was with the di vinci code

    Edie-An American Girl by Jean Stein --fantastic, addicting, as a result of reading this book i think i added 10 related books to my reading list.

    For March I am currently reading Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her by Melanie Rehak.

  11. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    NSW, Australia
    Posts
    583
    White Teeth by Zadie Smith. Not as fantastic as I expected it to be, but OK.

    What to Expect The First Year by Heidi Murkoff, Sandee Hathaway, and Arlene Eisnberg. The first of many readings of this one I expect.


 
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