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  1. #1
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    How many classics have you read?

    I have decided to read every classic I can, just for fun. Sort of. Often they're very hard to read, so it might not be terribly fun.
    Here are the classics I've read:

    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Lewis Carroll)
    Through the Looking Glass (Lewis Carroll)
    The Wizard of Oz (L. Frank Baum)
    The Land of Oz (L. Frank Baum)
    Ozma of Oz (L. Frank Baum)
    The Magic of Oz (L. Frank Baum)
    Treasure Island (Robert Louis Stevenson)
    Kidnapped! (Robert Louis Stevenson)
    The Wind in the Willows (Kenneth Grahame)
    The Adventures of Tom Saywer (Mark Twain)
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Mark Twain)

    I think these ones count as classics:

    The Hobbit (J.R.R. Tolkien)
    The Lord of the Rings (J.R.R. Tolkien)

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  3. #2
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    If you try to read every classic, you'll be reading for a verrrrrry long time.
    I'd count Lord of the Rings as one book (the publisher divided the books up, not the author), and the first Oz book as a classic. Maybe you're fonding classics hard to read because you're seeing this as a project, or because the labguage is denser than your usual reading? Tolkien is heavy sledding on a good day, and I find the Oz books to be a bit dull at times.

    Here are some classic books that are pretty straightforward, and sometimes a bit surprising.

    The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle (http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/9/6/964/964.txt)
    Black Boy by Richard Wright
    Bulfinch's Mythology
    (http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/bulf/index.htm)
    The Trumpet of the Swan by EB White
    Stuart Little by EB White
    The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle (http://www.sherlockian.net/canon/)
    Dracula by Bram Stoker (http://www.online-literature.com/stoker/dracula/)
    Grimm's Fairy Tales (http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~spok/grimmtmp/)
    The Time Machine by HG Welles (http://www.online-literature.com/wellshg/timemachine/)
    Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs (http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~rgs/tarz-table.html)
    A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens (http://www.literature.org/authors/di...es/two-cities/)
    Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    Emma by Jane Austen
    The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy (http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~rgs/scarp-table.html)
    The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/Literatu...Autobiography/)


    That should give you some good places to start.

  4. #3
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    I think "classic" is a very subjective term, BUT when my library queue gets dry I turn to the modern library top 100. Out of them I have read 25 (number indicates ranking on list):
    • 1. ULYSSES by James Joyce
      2. THE GREAT GATSBY by F. Scott Fitzgerald
      3. A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN by James Joyce
      4. LOLITA by Vladimir Nabokov
      5. BRAVE NEW WORLD by Aldous Huxley
      9. SONS AND LOVERS by D.H. Lawrence
      10. THE GRAPES OF WRATH by John Steinbeck
      13. 1984 by George Orwell
      7. THE HEART IS A LONELY HUNTER by Carson McCullers
      18. SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE by Kurt Vonnegut
      25. A PASSAGE TO INDIA by E.M. Forster
      31. ANIMAL FARM by George Orwell
      41. LORD OF THE FLIES by William Golding
      48. THE RAINBOW by D.H. Lawrence
      49. WOMEN IN LOVE by D.H. Lawrence
      55. ON THE ROAD by Jack Kerouac
      56. THE MALTESE FALCON by Dashiell Hammett
      64. THE CATCHER IN THE RYE by J.D. Salinger
      65. A CLOCKWORK ORANGE by Anthony Burgess
      67. HEART OF DARKNESS by Joseph Conrad
      74. A FAREWELL TO ARMS by Ernest Hemingway
      83. A BEND IN THE RIVER by V.S. Naipaul
      88. THE CALL OF THE WILD by Jack London
      94. WIDE SARGASSO SEA by Jean Rhys
      98. THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE by James M. Cain

  5. #4
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    I have read only eleven from the Modern Library list. They are:
    The Grapes of Wrath
    The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
    Slaughterhouse 5
    The Good Soldier
    All the King's Men
    The Bridge at San Luis Rey
    Deliverance
    Point Counterpoint
    Catcher in the Rye
    The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie
    Call of the Wild

    Others:
    A whole lot of George Eliot, specifically Middlemarch, Silas Marner, Romola and Daniel Deronda
    Everything by Jane Austen
    A fairish bit of Dickens (Tale of Two Cities, Bleak House, David Copperfield and Great Expectations)
    My absolute favorite Twain books are Huckleberry Finn and Puddnhead Wilson
    Every Sherlock Holmes novel and story there is
    And I am probably the only person you'll ever meet who has read any of the novels of Benjamin Disraeli.

  6. #5
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    From the Modern Library list I have read:

    ULYSSES by James Joyce
    THE GREAT GATSBY by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    CATCH-22 by Joseph Heller
    1984 by George Orwell
    ANIMAL FARM by George Orwell
    TROPIC OF CANCER by Henry Miller
    THE CATCHER IN THE RYE by J.D. Salinger
    MAIN STREET by Sinclair Lewis
    WIDE SARGASSO SEA by Jean Rhys

    And from the reader's list:
    TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD by Harper Lee
    THE FRENCH LIEUTENANT'S WOMAN by John Fowles
    BELOVED by Toni Morrison
    ABSALOM, ABSALOM! by William Faulkner
    FARENHEIT 451 by Ray Bradbury

    There are plenty non-modern classics not listed here that I've enjoyed too.

  7. #6
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    2. THE GREAT GATSBY by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    3. A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN by James Joyce
    5. BRAVE NEW WORLD by Aldous Huxley
    8. DARKNESS AT NOON by Arthur Koestler (Is this really a classic?)
    13. 1984 by George Orwell
    15. TO THE LIGHTHOUSE by Virginia Woolf
    19. INVISIBLE MAN by Ralph Ellison
    20. NATIVE SON by Richard Wright

    31. ANIMAL FARM by George Orwell
    38. HOWARDS END by E.M. Forster
    52. PORTNOY'S COMPLAINT by Philip Roth
    55. ON THE ROAD by Jack Kerouac
    58. THE AGE OF INNOCENCE by Edith Wharton
    61. DEATH COMES FOR THE ARCHBISHOP by Willa Cather
    64. THE CATCHER IN THE RYE by J.D. Salinger
    67. HEART OF DARKNESS by Joseph Conrad
    69. THE HOUSE OF MIRTH by Edith Wharton
    72. A HOUSE FOR MR BISWAS by V.S. Naipaul
    82. ANGLE OF REPOSE by Wallace Stegner
    88. THE CALL OF THE WILD by Jack London
    90. MIDNIGHT'S CHILDREN by Salman Rushdie
    94. WIDE SARGASSO SEA by Jean Rhys
    96. SOPHIE'S CHOICE by William Styron

  8. #7
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    for someone who considers herself fairly well-read I was surprised at how few of these I'd read, and also that there were some title and authors I'd never even heard of.

    There were a few missing that I would have included, like The Advenutre of Huckleberry Finn" and Dickens.

    2. THE GREAT GATSBY by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    5. BRAVE NEW WORLD by Aldous Huxley
    10. THE GRAPES OF WRATH by John Steinbeck
    13. 1984 by George Orwell
    20. NATIVE SON by Richard Wright
    28. TENDER IS THE NIGHT by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    31. ANIMAL FARM by George Orwell
    35. AS I LAY DYING by William Faulkner
    53. PALE FIRE by Vladimir Nabokov
    64. THE CATCHER IN THE RYE by J.D. Salinger
    76. THE PRIME OF MISS JEAN BRODIE by Muriel Spark
    79. A ROOM WITH A VIEW by E.M. Forster
    88. THE CALL OF THE WILD by Jack London
    90. MIDNIGHT'S CHILDREN by Salman Rushdie

  9. #8
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    To Kill a Mockingbird
    1984
    Catch 22
    The Great Gatsby
    Brave New World
    Animal Farm
    shane
    Catcher in the Rye
    On the Road
    The Handmaid's Tale

    I have also read The Illiad and the Odyssey, Huck Finn and tom Sawyer, a Tale of Two Cities, The Count of Monte Cristo, and a lot of Shakespeare (MacBeth is my favorite)

    What do y'all think about the writings of Salman Rushdie? Never thought to read anything by him.

  10. #9
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    HAVE READ (off the main list and the reader's list)
    ULYSSES and A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN by Joyce (I have a Joyce thing, though I've yet to do Finnegan's Wake)
    THE GREAT GATSBY by Fitzgerald
    LOLITA by Nabokov
    BRAVE NEW WORLD by Huxley
    CATCH-22 by Heller (probably one of my top 5 novels; just a great book; gonna have to reread it soon!)
    1984 by Orwell
    TO THE LIGHTHOUSE by Woolf
    SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE by Vonnegut (and a bunch of other Vonnegut books)
    ANIMAL FARM by Orwell
    SISTER CARRIE by Dreiser
    LIGHT IN AUGUST by Faulkner (probably my least favorite of read books)
    THE MALTESE FALCON by Hammett
    A CLOCKWORK ORANGE by Burgess
    THE MAGUS by Fowles
    WIDE SARGASSO SEA by Rhys
    THE LORD OF THE RINGS by Tolkein
    THE MOON IS A HARSH MISTRESS and STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND by Heinlein
    THE STAND by King
    BELOVED by Morrison
    ON THE ROAD by Kerouac
    THE HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY by Adams
    THE HANDMAID'S TALE by Atwood
    ZEN AND THE ART OF MOTORCYCLE MAINTENANCE by Pirsig
    THE CALL OF THE WILD by London
    WATERSHIP DOWN by Adams
    NAKED LUNCH by Burroughs
    GUILTY PLEASURES by Hamilton (So not a modern classic, bah; I know that some of the sci-fi and King books on the reader's list may not be other people's ideas of classic, but there's a HUGE qualitative difference between Heilein's TMiaHM and Hamilton's writing...any of it. I read her, but I admit they're "popcorn" books and would never think of submitting them as classics.)
    IT by King

    Ones on the list I've not read and am a bit ashamed to admit include The Grapes of Wrath, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, The Catcher in the Rye, Heart of Darkness, To Kill a Mockingbird, Farenheit 451, My Antonia...

    Clearly, I know what to do with my new library card! Thanks for the inspiration, littlefarmgirl. :D

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CraftinFool
    There were a few missing that I would have included, like The Advenutre of Huckleberry Finn" and Dickens.
    I don't believe they specify on the link, but the list is the best 100 english language novels of the 20th century.


 
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