Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,563

    What did you read in February 2007?

    February:

    Books:
    Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger - Very interesting to read as an adult. Not only did I not relate to Caulfield as much, I was almost positive he was clinically insane and that the narrative may not have been intended to reflect what "really happened."

    Audiobooks:
    Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, a Man Who Would Cure the World by Tracy Kidder - Awful. It was meant to be hagiography, but I ended up hating Farmer. Just read Farmer if you are interested in his work - he's not that hard to understand.

    Comics:
    The Amazing Joy Buzzards: Volume 1 by Mark Smith and Dan Hipp - Eh, not my thing.

    Zombieworld: Champion Of The Worms by Mike Mignola and Pat McEown - Fun stuff. Very fast paced and entertaining.

    Fables, Vol. 6: Homelands by Bill Willingham - The Adversary!

    In the Shadows of Their Fathers (Star Wars: Empire, Vol. 6) by Thomas Andrews, Scott Allie, Adriana Melo, and Michel LaCombe - A great volume in this series, really linking the clone wars comics to the rest of the universe.

  2. # ADS

  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    347
    The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck. I started reading it in September and I didn't finish it until Feb! I don't why it took so long to read.

    Lovers and Players by Jackie Collins. I managed to finish that one in a couple of days.

  4. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    43
    Montmorency on the Rocks: Doctor, Aristocrat, Murderer? by Eleanor Updale. Very good. What's weird is how different Montmorency seems in this book than in the first one. I think it's the absence of Scarper, for the most part.

    The Divide, Back to the Divide, and some of Jinx on the Divide by Elizabeth Kay. I did finish the last one, just not in February. They were pretty good, but definitely not part of my "core library".

    Heir Apparent by Vivian Vande Velde. A really, really cool concept, and a good book.

    The Printer's Devil by Paul Bajoria. Predictable in some ways, completely unpredictable in others.

    Anatopsis by David Abouzied.

    A Stranger Came Ashore by Mollie Hunter.

    And my big reading triumph of the month:

    The Lord of the Rings!
    I dreamed about it for days after finishing it. I kind of wish it were longer.

    I read a lot of Muse magazines too. They're very interesting. I learned all kinds of cool facts.

  5. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    New Brunswick, NJ
    Posts
    89
    All three volumes of The Lord of the Rings? I loved reading that. I read it a couple of years ago, finally. The nice thing about long books is that you get to enjoy them for a long time. It's especially nice when a writer has written many long books! (I'm thinking of Tolkien and Eliot.)

    I read The Death of Ramon Gonzalez by Angus Wright, for a class. It was great. I keep recommending it to people. For the same class, I read Our Ecological Footprint by Mathis Wackernagel and someone else. People love this book, but I felt it was kind of a letdown. Repetitive and mostly stuff I already knew--I want things I DON'T know.

    Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi, for the second time. This is for a book club.
    Since I already read the book, I thought I might read some other stuff relating to the book club book to contribute to our conversation, so I read Stories by Iranian Women since the Revolution, edited by Soraya Sullivan. The introduction was really...odd...implying that opposition to the practices of the Islamic Republic of Iran is a "Western" idea, that women's equality is something "Western" women want to impose on Iran, but the stories were nothing like that and mostly critical of the regime. It was a really interesting book.

    Now I'm reading Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray. This will probably take me awhile. I usually don't like stories"without a hero" but Thackeray is SO FUNNY!!!!

  6. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Hell's Kitchen
    Posts
    209
    Niagra Falls All Over Again, by Elizabeth McCracken - Beautiful, funny, poignant. Exquiste storytelling about a double act from the days of vaudeville throughout their lives. Themes of home and family and guilt. There is a great line toward the end about how we accept guilt about things that have nothing to do with us, and yet are quick to defend and deny it when guilt is our due.

    I started, but could not finish Agatha Christie's Hallowe'en Party. I had just watched "Murder on the Orient Express" and "Witness for the Prosecution", two old movie favorites and thought I should read some Agatha Christie. I hadn't read any since high school (Witness... and Murder in Retrospect were two faves). Well, I just about killed from boredom. Every chapter - and each Poirot interview - began with a recap of the facts the reader already knew and speculation (followed by explanation) as to why Poirot would take the case. I got barely half-way through before I just didn't care who killed Joyce Reynolds and whether or not she'd witnessed a murder herself, though most people doubted it because she was prone to boasting.

    Anyone have any AC they would recommend that won't knock me out? I like a slow paced story, I just don't like being spoonfed.

  7. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    New Brunswick//Princeton NJ
    Posts
    80
    atonement~ Ian McEwan: I've realized that I like love. And war. And when there is love during war....ohman. haha. I also think I like really tragic love stories. They simply destroy me. McEwan's prose is so beautifully written. I think I might be a fan.

    Brave New World~ Aldous Huxley: dystopic look into our future. This is a revist, since I did read it back in high school i really liked the whole description of the world of the future- the castes, the technology, the sex lives.

    about alive~ calvin trillin. A simple story written by a man who loved his late wife so very much. very heartfelt, and a proper tribute..

    on golden road:notes on my gentrification callie millner- unfortunately, I didn't finish the book, but I enjoyed what I read. She's a very articulate writer for her age, and I identified with the notion of being 'between' cultures, and not being able to fully identify with either.

  8. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    NSW, Australia
    Posts
    583
    The Memory Keeper's Daughter.

  9. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Far away
    Posts
    462
    Slow month for me...

    The Code Book by Simon Singh. Really enjoyed it.

  10. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    108
    Bleach Vol. 6- Tite Kubo: I can't remember specific events from this manga now because all of the volumes kind of blur together, but this is the most humorous manga I read, so every volume is a fun read.

    Green Rider- Kristen Britain: Good first novel, nice fantasy story, I'll be reading the sequel this month.

    Exile's Honor- Mercedes Lackey: Even though Lackey's quirks got on my nerves a bit, I still enjoyed this. It was nice revisiting this series.

    Shadows of Myth- Rachel Lee: I know I'm repeating myself, but why do most of the Luna books have to suck so much? I thought a fantasy imprint focusing on women would be cool, but the female characters in most of these books are so unempowered and this book was no exception.

    Fruits Basket Vol. 15- Natsuki Takaya: Aw, Yuki has a secret admirer. I loved the Cinderella-ish play in this volume. Very cute.

    One Good Knight- Mercedes Lackey: Now this is what I expected from Luna and I wish all of the series were as good as Lackey's. Cute fairy tale retelling with dumb unicorns, friendly dragons, and kick-butt girls. I just wish Lackey didn't completely ignore homosexuality in this series and I'm getting sick of her virgin heroines and other assorted romance cliches she throws in, which just makes it seem like she's trying too hard to make this a romance when it's romantic fantasy (there is a big difference).

  11. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    3
    No One write to the Colonel, Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim, David Sedaris

    and, alot of text books :)


 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Remove Ads

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Books read in February 2008
    By brdgt in forum Book Worms
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-17-2008, 09:02 AM
  2. What did you read in June 2007?
    By brdgt in forum Book Worms
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-05-2007, 07:48 PM
  3. What did you read in May 2007?
    By brdgt in forum Book Worms
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-28-2007, 02:29 PM
  4. What did you read in February 2006?
    By brdgt in forum Book Worms
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 03-14-2006, 09:07 PM
  5. What did you read in February 2005?
    By brdgt in forum Book Worms
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 03-24-2005, 08:56 AM