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  1. #1
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    What did you read in July 2007?

    I actually read three non-school-related books this month, so I'm all excited about starting this thread.

    The Difference Engine by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. I liked it. It's an alternative history if Babbage's engines and steam power had become widespread. I guess it would be classified as steampunk, but it wasn't so much to me. It was fun to read, and I liked the way the alternative social and political structures were set up. The women characters were disappointingly minor and two-dimensional though.

    Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich. I have read parts of this, and have been meaning to read the whole thing. It was very interesting and engaging, and also sad. If you haven't read it, it's worth checking out. I've worked a number of menial minimum-wage jobs, but I haven't waitressed so it was interesting to learn about that.

    The Grizzly Maze by Nick Jans. I borrowed this from a friend to read on the drive to Albuquerque since it looked interesting. It was atually better than I expected. I haven't seen Grizzly Man and was only vaguely familiar with Timothy Treadwell but this book seemed to present a more balanced view of him than other sources. It also had information about bear attacks in general that was interesting.

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  3. #2
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    the kindness of strangers, edited by don george - tales of fortune on the road. it is a collection of short stories of that stranger who pops up most unexpectedly at the time when you need it most. really enjoyed it.

    their eyes were watching god - i am still in the midst of getting into it, meaning i am not quite past chapter 1 yet. i like it, but keep getting distracted.

    i am re-reading the house on garibaldi street, which is the true story of the hunt for adolf eichmann after he escaped germany after the end of ww2. great reading.

    after i finish their eyes were watching god, i am planning on re-reading the mouse and the motorcycle by beverly cleary.....i just found it when i was unpacking....lol.

  4. #3
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    FICTION:

    Suite Française by Irene Nemirovsky (Sandra Smith, translator) - I really didn't think I was going to like this (it was chosen for my book club) but I ended up loving it and the fact that the author wrote it long hand during the German occupation of France and planned on writing three more sections before being sent to Auschwitz makes it even more amazing.

    The Inquest by Jeffrey Marshall - Written by a former boss of mine. The premise is great - he discovered documents relating to a death resulting from an abortion in early nineteenth century Vermont but didn't have enough evidence for a non-fiction book, so he wrote a fictionalized account told from different perspectives (a la Rashamon). Unfortunately the premise was better than the execution.

    Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by JK Rowling - Reread for the new book.

    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by JK Rowling - Reread for the new book.

    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by JK Rowling - Reread for the new book.

    COMICS:


    Y: The Last Man (Vol. 7: Paper Dolls) by Brian K. Vaughan (Author) and Pia Guerra (Illustrator) - The library took forever to get this in, but it didn't disappoint. Some interesting plot connections being made and I like the use of flashbacks.

    DMZ (Vol. 2: Body of a Journalist) by Brian Wood (Author) and Riccardo Burchielli (Illustrator) - We learn a lot more about why NYC has turned into the DMZ, which at first bothered me (the mystery had a nice effect) but I realize why it's necessary to move the plot forward.

    The Walking Dead (Vol. 4: The Heart's Desire) by Robert Kirkman (Author), Charlie Adlard (penciler/inker), and Cliff Rathburn (Gray Tones) - An interesting new character is introduced, but otherwise forgettable.

    The Walking Dead (Vol. 5: The Best Defense by Robert Kirkman (Author), Charlie Adlard (penciler/inker), and Cliff Rathburn (Gray Tones) - Probably the best issue so far and a great ending.

    SCHOOL:

    No Magic Bullet: A Social History of Venereal Disease in the United States since 1880
    Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment
    False Dawn: The Rise and Decline of Public Health Nursing, 1900-1930
    The Physician’s Hand: Work Culture and Conflict in American Nursing
    Bargaining for Life: A Social History of Tuberculosis, 1876-1938
    Living in the Shadow of Death: Tuberculosis and the Social Experience of Illness in American History
    Contagion and Confinement: Controlling Tuberculosis along the Skid Road
    Disease and Class: Tuberculosis and the Shaping of Modern North American Society
    Disorders of Desire: Sex and Gender in Modern American Sexology
    Nymphomania: A History
    Wake Up Little Susie: Single Pregnancy and Race Before Roe v. Wade
    Fallen Women, Problem Girls: Unmarried Mothers and the Professionalization of Social Work, 1890-1945
    Delinquent Daughters: Protecting and Policing Adolescent Female Sexuality in the United States, 1885-1920
    Sapphic Slashers: Sex, Violence, and American Modernity
    Changing Sex: Transsexualism, Technology, and the Idea of Gender

  5. #4
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    wow brdgt, you read a lot for school!!! how do you have time for everything?

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by janaka
    wow brdgt, you read a lot for school!!! how do you have time for everything?
    I'm at the prelim stage of my program, which means reading rather than classes - it's all I do (well, that, and write book reviews about those books). Essentially, it's my job to read.

  7. #6
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    The Bookseller of Kabul, Asne Seierstad. Great book!! Gives some insight into how women are treated in Afghanistan.

    Am currently almost finished with:
    The Memory Keeper's Daughter, Kim Edwards. Such a great writer. I can barely put this book down.

  8. #7
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    The Kite Runner- Khaled Hosseini- great book, I couldn't put it down

    The Invisible Wall- Harry Bernstein- another one I sped through, I love memoirs

    The Glass Castle- Jeanette Walls- again, I love memoirs

    The Children of Hurin- Tolkien- Not as good as others, but I enjoy tolkien a lot

    Memoris of a Geisha- Arthur Golden- good book, I learned a ton

    Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows- been waiting for this for a while, thought it was wonderful

    It may look like a lot, but I was on vacation for the first half of the month, and reading is easy to do at the lake!

  9. #8
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    Can't remember if they were all in July; maybe partly in June-

    The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman: loved it, didn't know it was actually a "children's" book until later because it was so heavy. Loved the fact that the female lead was likeable without being overly goody-goody.

    Messenger of Truth by Jaqueline Winspear: From the Maisie Dobbs series of books. About a former WWI nurse who later becomes a detective; each mystery involves the aftermath of WWI in some way.

    Mere Christianity by CS Lewis (not all the way through, still just reading chapters here and there)

  10. #9
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    Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. It was worth the wait. I usually read a lot, but I think that was it.

  11. #10
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    wow brdgt, i'm glad you're in school because i was feeling super-duper lame! :)

    i'm re-reading sophie's choice. i read it about 6 years ago (i think the year after i graduated from college) because an ex-boyfriend recommended it. he said it made him quit believing in god but i didn't have anywhere near that strong a response to it. so i'm re-reading it just out of curiosity to see if i have any stronger of a response.

    i'm also reading (this is bad news, i'm never good at reading 2 books at once) Ben Jerrys Double Dip: How to Run a Values Led Business and Make Money Too. so far very interesting.

    janaka, i went to visit my 5 year old nephew in january and took him a copy of the mouse and the motorcycle. we read it together and it was totally as good as i remembered it being. sadly, my visit ended before we finished the book...maybe i need to get my own copy!


 
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