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  1. #1
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    Learning to Bake Bread

    I would like to learn to bake my own bread as a way to save money for my family. Does anyone have any suggestions for a good book to start with? It will have to be oven-baked bread; I can't afford a bread machine.

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  3. #2
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    There is an older Mollie Katzen cookbook called "The Enchanted Broccoli Forest" that has extensive illustrated instructions for making bread. it's a great book for beginners, and you library probably has it if you don't want to buy it.

    in terms of saving money... baking all of your own bread is a pretty large commitment in terms of time. if you have a lot of time on your hands, i would say go for it, but if you work full time or are very busy, you might want to find a less labor-intensive way to save money.

  4. #3
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    Brenda- I admire you for wanting to learn the old-fashioned method (without a bread machine) That's my favorite way to do it too..it feels so earth-womany. However, if you do want a shortcut now and then, I have often seen bread machines at thrift stores (namely Salvation Army and Goodwill) You should probably make sure all the parts are there before buying but I think it would be worth it to have a look-see.

    Oh and I use some bread recipes out of the Better Homes and Gardens cookbook that are good. You could also search around on allrecipes.com

    Good luck![/i]

  5. #4
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    Brenda, the book I learned from many moons ago is called Favorite Breads from Rose Lane Farms. What I like about it is that it clearly explains the chemistry involved. Once you know the basic care and feeding of yeast and how to knead, every batch of bread you make will turn out fine. I never use a recipe anymore. I accidentally forgot to return it to the college library, but now it's out in paperback. Highly recommended.

  6. #5
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    Thanks, Schmatta!

  7. #6
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    I thought about doing this in terms of saving money as well, and I'm not sure that making your own bread is necessarily the thriftiest way to go about it. The reason? Homemade bread is so good it gets gobbled up extra fast! It's rewarding, more healthy, and homemade though. I can't say I have any favorite recipes at this time, as I've barely dabbled in bread making and am still intimidated by yeast. If you want to make bread for money saving reasons,though, trying buying supplies in bulk, as that helps a lot.

  8. #7
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    Here's a good deal of information on baking artisan-style bread:

    http://foodiefarmgirl.blogspot.com/2...ter-bread.html

    The few times I"ve made loaves from scratch were just from recipes in cookbooks I had about the house--I imagine a search over at Epicurious or allrecipes would yield a good deal of information.

    Jen

  9. #8
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    I just wanted to add a thing about high altitude. I'm at 8,200 ft. and my bread was turning out horribly. I recently bought a baking book specifically written for high altitudes and it's made such a difference!

  10. #9
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    The Breadmakers apprentice is a great book.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by stella
    There is an older Mollie Katzen cookbook called "The Enchanted Broccoli Forest" that has extensive illustrated instructions for making bread. it's a great book for beginners, and you library probably has it if you don't want to buy it.

    in terms of saving money... baking all of your own bread is a pretty large commitment in terms of time. if you have a lot of time on your hands, i would say go for it, but if you work full time or are very busy, you might want to find a less labor-intensive way to save money.
    I totally agree with all of this. Mollie Katzen's bread guide is fabu.

    The one thing I will say about the time commitment of baking bread is that it really depends on what your schedule is like. The actual hands-on time of baking bread is only about 20-30 minutes per batch -- not much at all. But you do need looooong stretches of time for it to rise properly and bake. It's ideal for me because I work from home several days a week (grad student), not so ideal for those working outside the home with lots of weekend errands.


 
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