Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 45
  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    822
    You're right, Phisch, they DO have great resources listed!

  2. # ADS

  3. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    6
    Thanks everyone for sharing all this. That's great. Yeh, i agree, if i am going to homeschool, i definitely want benny to go to lots of stuff like art classes, sports, dance etc. and in NY, that should be pretty easy to do. i also agree that even though people worry about the socialization thing and homsechool, one of my (and my husband's) biggest worries about regular schooling is the socialization issue...and the institutionalisation issue. we're both academics and both have first hand experience of how institutionalised many kids are becoming these days (even the supposedly brightest and best going to university, find it hard to really express themselves and get passionate about subjects - of course, not all kids are like that, but it does seem increasingly common).

    thanks too for the tips on the Home School Legal Defense Association website. i'm going to look that up now.

    i love the sound of the charter school (that seems an ideal solution - kids going to school for some stuff, but being free to be homeschooled the rest of the time). i read about those in Gutterson's book about homeschooling. i don't think any exist in NYC, but i'm going to keep a look out.

  4. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    363
    what is "unschooling"?

  5. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    719
    Quote Originally Posted by moon_lemming
    Quote Originally Posted by Phisch
    There are even groups that are part homeschool, part "with everyone else" for lack of a better word for it. I know kids who went to a classroom setting twice a week and the rest of the week they studied at home.
    ooh, that reminded me that the other plus about the group was that there was a lady who was certified to teach Spanish in it, so a bunch of us kids would take Spanish classes together. it's great because you can pool resources like that.

    (I'm done, I promise! :) )
    Um, isn't that what public school is all about? Pooling resources? Teachers teaching things they personally are well-educated about?

    I have no real issue with home shcooling - people should raise their kids their own way. But I do like state-approved minimum curricula, and I do think my mom could not have taught me many things my teachers knew.

  6. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    822
    I am totally intimidated by the thought of teaching my son high school curricula. He's doing 5th grade work now, which is easy to teach. But we are planning on enrolling him in school when we're out of the urban school system. It just wasn't a good fit for him. There are plenty of folks around who DO make the commitment to teach their kids all the way through, and I'm in total awe of them. Keep in mind also, that the kids at the high school level take a lot of the responsibility of their own education on themselves. They are super-motivated to learn, probably b/c they don't have to learn within the constraints set forth in a classroom. The older home schooled kids tend to become partners w/ their parents in acheiving their educational goals. A lot of them are enrolled in classes at the local colleges and do many other activities and courses/classes outside of their home enviroment. And, of course, pooling resources is a big thing at that level. The kids can work together on the more complex things. It takes much more commitment, but I don't think it's any more difficult if the parent and kids are highly motivated.
    Here in NY parents become very creative in finding ways to teach things. I don't know how strict other states are, but have heard that NY has the most stringent standards for home schooling. You really have to toss out all preconceived notions and your own past school experiences becasue it is so very different from a standard school education! It's not easy to do. It took me a long time to stop stressing out and trust that I did know what I was doing. It takes even longer to convince family and friends that you don't HAVE to run things just like a typical school does. That really, if we allow ourselves, learning happens every day at all times of the day. Not just Monday thru Friday b/t 8 and 3.
    But now I sound like I'm lecturing! LOL!! Really...if you make the decision, dont' sweat it at all, know your regulations backwarsd and forwards, and know what your district is allowed to ask you for. They CAN'T ask you for more than the regulations state. Believe me, there are a lot of school districts that just don't understand that and try to make folks miserable in the process. You have to be prepared to fight. I never have had to, but know people in other districts who've had to say "I don't see where it says you need this" Can you tell me the regulation number where I can find it?"

  7. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    624
    Quote Originally Posted by delqc
    Um, isn't that what public school is all about? Pooling resources? Teachers teaching things they personally are well-educated about?

    I have no real issue with home shcooling - people should raise their kids their own way. But I do like state-approved minimum curricula, and I do think my mom could not have taught me many things my teachers knew.
    I was just trying (badly probly) to say this:
    if you are homeschooling, a major benefit of joining a homeschool GROUP is that you can find other parents who have resources you may not have and you can share those resources.

  8. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    13
    One of those resources is definitely having others around who can teach subjects that you'd rather not for some reason or another.

    As for HS subjects, one family I know opted to hire a tutor for science and math subjects. Or eke it out together. IMO, I think teenages benefit from parents admitting a little vunerability and showing some team work in learning together.

    Our county education dept. has a special independent study program for homschoolers. I think it's in case you decide to go back, then if you were working at a decent pace the child would be on par with everyone else. Maybe there's one where you are also?

    I wish I bookmarked it, but I read some months ago that Harvard's youngest tenured professor was homeschooled. They hired him because of his advanced geometry abilities or something like that. His dad did all the schooling and they made a living by traveling to various fairs and selling puzzles or something like that (crafty!).

  9. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    skamokawa, WA
    Posts
    144
    I unschool my oldest daughter, who is 11. My youngest in in public school by choice (hers, not mine or my husband's.)
    I doubt any of the good people here on getcrafty will flame me for this, but we don't use curriculum at all.
    Unschooling is basically, as I understand it, an approach that allows for the child to learn what they naturally gravitate towards. It requires a good deal of trust in both yourself (as teacher) and in the child.
    One of the questions that I ask people when I am talking to them about unschooling is, "What do you SPECIFICALLY remember from your years in elementary/(and even) secondary school?" Often people chuckle nervously and look off into the distance. Usually people don't have a long list of academic acheivements that they tell me about; more often it is something about the socialization. The point being we remember that information which is applicable in our lives. At our house, we focus on building up Alice's (and Opal's, even though I don't have her during the school day) strengths, so that she will excel in those fields. I do not spend much time trying to reinforce her in her areas of weakness. My experience tells me that she will not pursue a career in an area that she is weak in. By weak, I mean uninterested. She is not interested in certain subjects and therefore she is unmotivated to learn those subjects and time we spend on them is often time wasted, time spent looking out the window.

    One of the premises of unschooling is that you answer EVERY QUESTION THE CHILD ASKS, to the best of your ability. If you can't answer it, you help the child seek out the answer. The information the child receives this way is information retained! I have seen it again and again! When a person is ready to learn something, when they are naturally receptive, they seek that info out (if they have prior experience with their questions being answered.) For example, when a kid is ready to read, they learn how to read so quickly it boggles, and if they are learning to read "late" they often shoot right up to the reading level of their peers within a year. This happened in the case of my youngest. We kept checking in with her to see if she was ready to start reading, and she didn't take us up on it until she was 6 and a half, maybe almost seven. It was frustrating, but I tried not to compare her to other kids, and most importantly, I trusted her to let me know when she was able to develop that skill! Sure enough, within one year of learning to read, she was reading at a 6th grade level.
    If a child is supported in asking questions (by having them answered), she will keep asking. If a child doesn't get answers to her questions than over time she will learn it is pointless to ask, and her natural curiosity will be supressed.

    We do have to work on basic math. Granted, lots of math comes up in daily life, but we have needed to test them on the basic math facts. We do not focus on advanced maths though.

    I have to say that as far as socialization goes, we do notice a huge difference between home/unschooled kids and public school kids. The homeschool kids usually seem "different" and they are. My kids are a bit awkward in the society of their peers. They are missing massive cultural cues, and it is expounded by the fact that we don't watch commercial television. This might bother me more if I felt that they were missing a lot, but let's face it, mediocracy is the standard, at least in the community that I live in, and if they are not average it is okay with me. Of course, it means they are a little lonely. I am lonely too sometimes, and I went through public school!

    my daughter wants to be a librarian, and we have a plan for her continuing education that involves getting her into college two years early. She started researching her options sometime ago, and she has come up with much of the plan herself. She is motivated. (we even have housing set up for her for when she is in community college!)
    My oldest daughter has time to learn real life skills. Domestic skills. Farm skills. We have tons of time to do art. She has tons of time to read. She has basic chores and she can cook and bake and take care of animals and sew on buttons and even sew basic garments and do basic childcare. She knows where our water comes from. She has seen it run out, and she knows how to deal with that. In the next year or so we wil start building her a cabin of her own, and she will probably draw the plans for it, and learn more math, and learn more about systems, and so on and so on. Her life is starting now, and it is one big classroom, and I expect she will retain her sense of wonder and curiousity into adulthood.

    I know that people worry about kids not getting what they need education-wise in a homeschool setting, but I really try not to look at my kids' educations from a fear based perspective. I really believe they are both going to be fine. Actually, they are obviously quite brilliant, both of them!

  10. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    phildelphia
    Posts
    365
    Awesome post Sahnnon, as usual!

  11. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    6
    wow, thanks so much go-fish for your description and thoughts on unschooling your daughter. you are inspiring! i completely agree about letting kids learn when they want to learn. even with a 21month old i can see how that is a great strategy. and as you say there's no point comparing your kids to others - to an idea of normal - who wants to have 'normal' kids who are hooked on mtv and mcdonalds anyway??!


 
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Remove Ads

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Anyone thinking about Halloween yet?
    By babyface in forum Share A Craft
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 10-17-2011, 05:17 AM
  2. Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking
    By KittenHasAWhip in forum Book Worms
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-21-2007, 05:39 PM
  3. Critical Thinking (inspired by "truthiness")
    By stella in forum Freestyle
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 04-26-2006, 07:23 AM
  4. Thinking of getting a male kitten...cat#3
    By girlsavage in forum Freestyle
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-04-2005, 10:34 AM

Search tags for this page

i am thinking about homeschooling my son
,

my husband doesn't think homeschooling is a good idea

,
thinking about home schooling my 7th grade girl
,
were to start when thinking about home schooling in australia
Click on a term to search for related topics.