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  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    NSW, Australia
    Posts
    583
    I do feel a bit out of it when I'm thinking about summer and you winter! :-) But my winters are quite mild so I can grow continuously year round. The strangest thing to me is thinking about the way that some of you have a "season" of gardening, then the weather becomes too cold/snowy etc. and you have to stop (or move indoors?). During the winter I grow things like potatoes, carrots, parsnips, spinach, lettuce, onions, beans & Asian vegies like bok choy, tatsoi and choy sum.

    We aren't totally sure what type of frog it is - a friend who works for the National Parks & my father (a keen frog enthusiast) both think it is called a bleating tree frog - but we can't be sure. It is about the length of a finger. We have another type of frog in our yard, called the Dwarf Eastern Green Tree-Frog, and they are tiny, about the length of a thumbnail!

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  3. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    215
    Pudding you are too lucky. In Pittsburgh our winters get some snow. It's never horrible compared to what it could be. If you know anything about the American "zone system" I'm a zone 6a. The numbers get higher as we ge closer to the equator. If I was especially ambitious I cold probably make a cold frame with hay bales and a pane over top to extend the season, but I admit, I'm not that motivated, yet.

    Tomico

  4. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    nc
    Posts
    56
    That's it-- I'm moving to Australia! We hardly get any snow to speak of here, but I'm still weary of the cold and the dead leaves by February. I have a 2 1/2 year-old, so I haven't had a *real* garden in 2 years (he was born in the summer, and my best memories are the ones when I was hugely pregnant and working outside-- then I got to take him out to the garden when he was finally born). It was more complicated and exhausting to parent after those halcyon days, so I only did a little container planting here and there. Now we live in a house on a downward slope with lots of big trees. But I have a great sunny deck! Any ideas for low-maintenance, easy-peasy container plantings? Primarily veggies and herbs; I 've got a handle on the flowers.
    **Sorry this is so lonnggggg!

  5. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    NSW, Australia
    Posts
    583
    tiggycat, I'd do a theme! Plant a cherry tomato plant in one pot and some sweet basil in another (or plant the basil around the base of the tomato in the same pot). Apparently the basil makes the tomatoes more flavoursome and you can eat them together when they've grown!

    I like to grow herbs I'm actually going to use in my cooking (as opposed to one fanciful time when I made it my mission to grow every herb in existence in my 2mx2m garden: it didn't end well).

    I grow chives (for sprinkling on baked potatoes with sour cream) sage (for stuffing in a roast chicken with lemon), oregano, marjoram & thyme (for various pasta dishes) and parsley (for thousands of things). Mint is good too, and great for a pot because it can invade the garden if you plant it there.

    Do you have any big containers or pots? If so, you could plant a lemon tree too.

    Anyway, those are my suggestions! :-)

  6. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    232
    Hey Rissaroo - I thought I'd be way excited when I could plant stuff IN THE GROUND.
    But then I found out doing stuff in pots actually seemed (to me) way easier.
    Of course, we don't have the best soil around here.

  7. #26
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    OC CA
    Posts
    16
    Sewlittletime, I'm in Southern California on the Coast but if your yard grows anything then Begonias I bet would be so easy to grow and they look lovely! I have quite a few in my front yard and they've bloomed and filled out as soon as I planted them.

    Also look around for books that feature gardens/plants for New York and then breaks up what grows best in each zone. I have one for California. It was so helpful instead of wasting money on plants that wouldn't thrive in my area.


 
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