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Thread: losing weight?

  1. #11
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    Hey, it's slowgrafitti!

    Point taken. I just think for a lot of people it can seriously lead to healthy obsessive things (like, I would probably start obsessing). It's true, though, that you need to create a calorie deficit (nice term), but I think it should somehow be worked into one's lifestyle than being more conscious of it. Maybe that's a lofty ideal, though.

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  3. #12
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    Hey, check out this article in today's USA Today. This French lady (who's the CEO for Veuve Cliquot in the US) has written a book called, "French Women Don't Get Fat: A Guide to Eating for Pleasure." She said that when she moved to the US, she automatically gained 20 lbs. And most Americans who move to France lose accordingly.

    Her plan basically comes down to this: Eat only good food. Relax and savor every bite. She talks about the junk we cram into our mouths without noticing, about a few things we should keep in check (like sugary drinks --- but champagne and wine are OK!). And she talks a LOT about portion size. When you savor each bite, you don't need (or tend) to eat as much.

    And walk everywhere - and the pounds will just fall off. And the nutritionists quoted in the article agreed.

    This is what I found when I recently went on my version of a "diet" - cut out the crap. Eat well - only good food. Eat half as much at dinner (as before). And when I started walking my daughter to school in the morning (1 mile roundtrip), I got thinner right away. I don't count calories and I don't weigh myself. I judge myself by my fitness and how my clothes fit.

    Here's the link. Let me know what you think:

    http://www.usatoday.com/life/lifesty...et-cover_x.htm

  4. #13
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    Another book in that same vein is The Fat Fallacy by Dr. Clower about how the French and Mediterrean diet is different from the American diet and why it works. The premise is pretty much quality versus quantity and while I haven't noticed my clothes fitting any differently, after a week I do find myself snacking less and eating slower and thinking about your food is just such a nice thing to do. Tho' I do still eat a slice of pizza standing up in the kitchen but hey, we all have our weaknesses :)

    And I tried counting calories and it is way too easy to become obsessive doing that but just reading the labels made me more aware. I wouldn't count every single calorie now but I would read the labels to be aware of how many calories are in a serving and what a serving size actually is and all that. So no tally sheet for me, but I do like to know how many calories are in what I'm eating generally.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by cackalackie
    Hey, check out this article in today's USA Today. This French lady (who's the CEO for Veuve Cliquot in the US) has written a book called, "French Women Don't Get Fat: A Guide to Eating for Pleasure." She said that when she moved to the US, she automatically gained 20 lbs. And most Americans who move to France lose accordingly.

    Her plan basically comes down to this: Eat only good food. Relax and savor every bite. She talks about the junk we cram into our mouths without noticing, about a few things we should keep in check (like sugary drinks --- but champagne and wine are OK!). And she talks a LOT about portion size. When you savor each bite, you don't need (or tend) to eat as much.

    And walk everywhere - and the pounds will just fall off. And the nutritionists quoted in the article agreed.

    This is what I found when I recently went on my version of a "diet" - cut out the crap. Eat well - only good food. Eat half as much at dinner (as before). And when I started walking my daughter to school in the morning (1 mile roundtrip), I got thinner right away. I don't count calories and I don't weigh myself. I judge myself by my fitness and how my clothes fit.

    Here's the link. Let me know what you think:

    http://www.usatoday.com/life/lifesty...et-cover_x.htm
    A had a friend on the Realmofredheads.com that lives in France and she said it's so true! French women are not even chubby in the slightest bit. She said that a woman mistakened her for being expecting since she is heavier than the average females over there. Strange huh? I'm checking out this site for sure!

  6. #15
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    Actually, I don't think counting calories is the right way to do it etiher. It's better to do portion control. Eat normal portions of foods, even if you have to look on the box and see what that is. Eat several small meals a day instead of a few big ones. Drink tons of water.
    Park far away from stores unless you are buying something huge like a TV. There's no reason not to walk, and it's actually quicker and less wasteful because you won't sit there circleing the parking lot trying to find a space wasting gas. If stores are in the same shopping center, walk back to your car, put your stuff away, and then walk to the other store.
    I also don't think running is something most people should do. It's VERY hard on your joints and feet. Walk briskly instead.

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by soapandwater
    It's true, though, that you need to create a calorie deficit (nice term), but I think it should somehow be worked into one's lifestyle than being more conscious of it. Maybe that's a lofty ideal, though.
    Yeah, your point is taken as well. I definately agree with you on working calorie control into one's lifestyle so that it comes pretty naturally, but at the same time i think that for most people to get inot these habits a good amount of monitoring is needed. I think that realistically, for most people (including myself), that is a lofty goal. When I stop paying attention I look up a few months later and am stress eating loads of crap without realizing it and have a sodium intake 3 times above the recommended allowance ( i get really really, umm, puffy...it's not good). I do think it's important for people, when limiting/counting calories, to set both an upper and a lower limit, so that obsessing with the result of limiting calorie intake to non-existance won't happen, i.e. no more than 2000 but no less than 1700.

    Also, I think that for someone looking to change their lifestyle it does help to really track every bite for at least a week, to see where the bad habits really are. Most people don't realize that that one bottle of coke is 250 calories, that one can of soup is 2100 mg of sodium, or that two peices of white bread is 200 calories of nothingness.

    But yeah, so I think we mostly agree. :)

  8. #17
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    It frustrates me to hear people who have never had weight problems, or who have forgiving metabolisms, ridicule those of us who have had to count calories.
    Would you tell someone trying to lower their energy bills that they shouldn't pay attention to the energy efficiency of various appliances? Would you tell someone trying to budget their money that they shouldn't pay attention to how much money they've got in their bank account? Would you tell someone trying to improve their time management skills that they shouldn't look at how they're arranging their schedule? A lot of these kinds of things come naturally to some people; these people are often lucky enough to have been taught this stuff from birth.
    Of course, it's GREAT if these life skills become ingrained! But I think some people need to go through a stage of paying careful attention to things that can be measured and counted. At any rate, I don't think that paying careful attention to the calorie content of the foods you eat is cheating, and it certainly shouldn't be ridiculed.


    On a side note, I'm opposed to aspartame. Not only is it ineffective, but it's a known neurotoxin, increasing your risk of migraines and seizures (take it from someone who's experienced the latter)

  9. #18
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    Mr. Bubbles, I HAVE had weight problems, so please don't make assumptions. And the only thing that made me lose weight was changing my lifestyle completely, and I did not count calories or anything, but I did cut my portions, stop eating as much unhealthy food, and started exercising.

    And I was overweight and unhealthy! I WAS! I still am overweight, but I wouldn't say I'm really unhealthy. Cutting calories would not have worked for me and a lot of people like me because I have an obsessive nature, as many people do. Some people can handle counting calories fine, but if I messed up, even just a little, I'd become depressed too easily. It's a struggle for me to NOT get an eating disorder, especially after having been close with a few people with eating disorders and having to live with someone with an eating disorder. SO.

    I said that more as a word of a caution for people like me. And there are more people like me than you'd think.

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by soapandwater
    Cutting calories would not have worked for me and a lot of people like me because I have an obsessive nature, as many people do. Some people can handle counting calories fine, but if I messed up, even just a little, I'd become depressed too easily. It's a struggle for me to NOT get an eating disorder, especially after having been close with a few people with eating disorders and having to live with someone with an eating disorder.
    I'm not saying it works for everyone. I'm just saying it's frustrating when people get mocked for doing it. And I'm not saying that you're one of those people, I'm just saying there are SOME people (not necessarily anybody posting or reading) that have very little understanding of the effort that it takes to get in shape and make radical lifestyle changes.

    And yes, I agree that it's easy to become obsessive and depressed. I think I even mentioned this in my original post: losing weight without developing an eating disorder such as anorexia is tricky business. Since one of the risk factors for eating disorders is low self-esteem, I don't think that it helps when people are made fun of for counting calories.
    I know because this has happened to me, and I've seen it with friends and family as well. People trying to lose weight, get in shape, etc. need as much emotional support as possible!

    Anyway my main point stands: paying attention to calories is not cheating.

    I concede that I may have come on a little strong in my original post. I should have said "Counting calories worked for me".

    That being said, I think counting calories is a better alternative than commercial diets. Can we agree on that? I mean, it's free. Well, maybe not exactly free. Strictly speaking, we're already paying for it, through tax dollars, to the FDA, which requires companies to print nutritional information on their products. In general I'm in favor of using stuff I'm already paying for.


    A note to anyone joining this discussion. Please read the entire thread. I think this is a very nuanced issue and that we all actually agree more than we disagree.

  11. #20
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    With regard to losing weight, each person is individual and everyone needs their own approach. Here are the main tips for losing weight from me:


    1. Eat a healthy meal. Remove or reduce fast food, fatty foods, carbonated drinks and other sugary drinks.
    2. Sport. A gym or a special sport is the best choice. If you have little time then yoga, exercise in the morning or jogging does not take much time.
    3. Sleep. A person should sleep at least 7-8 hours, sleep better at 10-11 o'clock in the evening and get up at 5-6 o'clock in the morning.
    4. Hormonal level. After 30 starts, the level of hormones in the body will decrease. Major hormones, such as growth hormone, testosterone and estrogen, affect most processes in the body. Human growth hormone is the most important product. Energy, cell regeneration, metabolism, immunity, brain function, libido and heart health all depend on HGH every day (source: https://hghtherapydoctor.us/hgh-deficiency-testing/).


 
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