Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    624

    nutrition book recs?

    I'm looking for a book that can help me out nutrition-wise; not specific, superfoods!-type things, but a general "this is how your body works, these are the kinds of foods you need to be eating, this is why they help your body, here are some general guidelines" type of book.

    Basically, I'd like to see a nutritionist, but I understand this type of info better if I can read it and take my time with it. A nutritionist in book form, pretty much.

    Any suggestions would be so much appreciated -- I've been looking for a few months, and can't find anything that fits right.

  2. # ADS

  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    160
    dr. andrew weil's _eight weeks to optimum health_ (or is it "optimal"?) is a pretty good start, i think. he provides you with a different addition each week, if i remember correctly. like "add broccoli" and "add fish..." i don't know if that's exactly what you're looking for...he also incorporates things like "take a walk" and "get some fresh flowers in your home." i like his general philosophies. the library is a great place for this kind of research. i like to look at a wide variety of books and then pick and choose what's right for me.

    there are just so many books out there. it's so common for the authors tp advocate one thing, like cut carbs, or cut animal products...i tend to be really turned off by those restricting things.

    curious to hear other suggestions!

  4. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    The Great State of New Jersey
    Posts
    83
    The Harvard Guide to Healthy Eating is Supposedly pretty good: Amazon link There's a Web site that has a lot of useful info too.

    Jane Brody also has a good nutrition book that I've read in the bookstore a few times. It might be a little dated now though.

    They both don't advocate for or against one type of diet, the approach is more "moderation in all things" than eliminating entire food groups from your diet.

    Actually, I also like the food books aimed at teenagers because they don't assume as much knowledge.

    PS: I know you're looking for a book, but this web site is great: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/index.html

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    belleville, nj
    Posts
    467
    i second the harvard guide!

  6. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Philadelphia/NJ
    Posts
    54
    Eat To Live by Dr. Joel Fuhrman has completely changed my attitude towards food. His philosophy is that we should be eating food that has the most amount of nutrition with the least amount of calories - which puts green leafies on the bottom of the food pyramid. My small town library had a copy of it, so I would suggest checking at your local library first.

  7. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Washington DC
    Posts
    114
    I read the Harvard Guide last year. I was looking for exactly what you're looking for, scientific information on basic nutrition. That is the goal of the book, it is not a diet in any way, shape, or form though there are some recipes and suggestions at the end. For the most part, I really liked it and found it very informative. I made a few small changes based on it, such as eating flax seeds for essential fatty acids (there are not that many veggie sources of EFAs and I wasn't really getting any) and one big change, which was learning that it is OK to eat fat so I eat a lot more olive oil now (haven't gained any weight, either!).

    There are a few things I didn't like about it. One, the author says, "Why is 18.5 the lowest recommended BMI? There's no reason you can't go lower!" It is my firm belief that *all* American women are teetering on the brink of an eating disorder (and I am certainly no exception), and I did NOT need to read that. I had to skim the parts about what size/weight you should be very quickly to avoid absorbing them. It would be very bad for me to try to lose weight, as I am at the low end of healthy now. The other thing was that the author has a thorough and bizarre hatred of dairy products and doesn't think anyone should eat them ever. Maybe he has a point, but I ain't giving up cheese. I just shrugged my shoulders to that.

  8. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    119
    If you are into TRaditional Asian Medicine, ther eis an excellent book written by Paul Pitchford called Healing with WHolefoods.

    It bascially brings traditional Asian medicne with current western research on health and nutrition. It gives you the tools to prepare your own diet, and has ALOT of great information.

  9. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    624
    awesome suggestions! thanks, grrrls : )

  10. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    624
    early morning double post.

    rock on.


 

Remove Ads

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Sewing machine recs?
    By lazysundae in forum Domestic Bliss
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-16-2011, 09:55 PM
  2. What is the name of this book?
    By MizMosa in forum Book Worms
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-20-2006, 06:05 PM
  3. book club, book read along, etc
    By janaka in forum Book Worms
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 08-30-2006, 05:37 PM
  4. crafty workshops in toronto: recs please!
    By hodge in forum Freestyle
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-14-2005, 08:41 AM
  5. Replies: 22
    Last Post: 10-23-2004, 05:48 PM