View Poll Results: Do I put in the notice to quit, or wait a few weeks?

Voters
13. You may not vote on this poll
  • Put in the notice!

    8 61.54%
  • Wait a few weeks

    5 38.46%
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Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Celery City, MI
    Posts
    278

    quitting gracefully (long)

    Background: My husband got a job in a different state and has been living there for more than three months now (with my parents). Our plan was for me to stay here and finish out our lease, and use the extra time to job hunt etc. So I'm here alone, and we visit on weekends. Nobody except a few friends & family knows this at the moment.

    Now the dilemma, part one:

    My plan for a long time was to give my job one month's notice. If I did that, I would still have three weeks to go before I put in the notice.

    Alas, fall is usually a busy time at my place, and I kind of think that in three years there I have established myself well and people like working with me. You could say I'm sort of a go-getter. So a lot of people are coming to me with requests for project assistance, and I keep having to lie to not help them. I also have to lie about why my husband isn't around, can't pick me up, etc. It feels bad.

    I am tempted to put in that notice, like *now*, so that we can reorganize some of these projects instead of me just jumping ship halfway through. Or, me not helping them would make more sense to them if they knew I was leaving in late September instead of some made-up reason.


    The dilemma, part two:

    We are trying to buy a house in the other state. This is, guess what, expensive!! As I have no job lined up in the new place yet, I can not afford to leave my job any earlier than late September, or break our lease.

    My line of work is not that common, and we're going from Chicago to podunk Michigan, so it is very unlikely I'll be able to find something similar. The salary will most definitely not be matched (not like it's tons of $ to begin with, but big city to small city usually equals a little pay cut...)


    So where I am stuck is: Do I put in my notice now, saying that I'll be gone in seven or eight weeks, to make my coworkers' lives easier? I could kind of be risking getting asked to leave sooner doing this, but I'm not sure because no one else there has ever put in a really long-term resignation notice.

    I like my job a lot and it's been hard planning to leave it at all. I want to be responsible to them as they have been to me, but I also need to protect myself at this time of much life uncertainty!

    Help!!!

    Later on, we'll get into how I am going to quit being the organizer of my local Stitch-n-Bitch too.

    Thank you for another chance to narcissistically blab,
    Heidi

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  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    456
    If you are friendly with your coworkers and will feel guilty if they get swamped in the fall, definitly tell them now to give them enough time to find someone and train them. I, personally, don't think two weeks is enough notice for a company to hire someone good for the job and then train them efficiently. (companies like grocery stores and retail stuff isn't the same, you know?)

  4. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    denver, colorado
    Posts
    382
    I'm always afraid if I put in my notice too early at a job that people (co-workers, boss) will start acting differently towards me once they know I'll be leaving. But I think that's just my mind overworking - in my experience it's always been better to be upfront ASAP. Plenty of notice usually means ample time to divide your duties/look for a new hire/train a new hire (at my last job, I even wound up training the new person, which my old boss was incredibly grateful for), and I doubt that they'd let you go too much before you're planning to leave. It's hard to tell I guess, since you haven't seen others give long-term resignations. I'd say go with your gut feeling, what feels right - it sounds like you'd feel better giving them the truth now.

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Ferndale is a cowtown!
    Posts
    124
    Maybe give them 4 weeks notice? Last time I quit I gave a really long notice, and I was going crazy by the time my last day rolled around. 4 weeks is still respectful, and would allow time to train the newbie.

  6. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Biggest Little City in the World
    Posts
    267
    Hey Heidi,

    Feel free to e-mail or PM me for a longer chat. But I just saw this and I'd say if you've had a good relationship with your colleagues, it's a good idea to give them enough advance notice in order to plan for the busy season, write up a new job description for the opening et cetera. That way you've been honest & told them about the change due to Rodney's new job and also bought yourself extra time while house hunting. Like I said, if you've had a good professional relationship with these people, they should probably be okay for making it work through your time period. A former coworker of mine (also an archivist) did the same thing when her husband got into medical school in another part of the state. She was upfront about it, they worked with her schedule (she was job hunting down there before finally making the move) and still enjoy a good relationship with her. The latter is important because if you leave on a good note, these people could come to your aid later on with providing references or job openings.

    Good luck! It's stressful but how exciting that the two of you will finally be making the move into a new house & starting a family!

  7. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    82
    I had a similar problem last year -- I liked my coworkers and didn't want to leave them in the dust so I let them know about a month before my actual departure. I would say it was good and bad, my boss was able to start to look for a replacement sooner and start to think about how she would have to change things, etc. The bad part was that there was extra time for the staff members annoyed by my move to nag me about it and by the time my last day rolled around I couldn't wait to get away from them.
    I guess I feel like I left on more positive terms than some of my other coworkers who just gave the standard two week notice and left everyone scrambling, SO I would probably advise to give a longer notice.

  8. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Celery City, MI
    Posts
    278
    One little thing to add: they won't hire someone to replace me until well after I am gone--it's just the way of my place. After I leave, the job description has to be reviewed, sent to HR, and when it comes back, only then can they start recruiting. It is kind of a pain in the ass. So I definitely won't be training anybody to take my job, other than the people who are already there.

    Snufkin, I got your postcard yesterday. Thank you! I'm getting in touch off the forums today for sure.

  9. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    404
    Since they're coming to you for projects, I would go ahead and tell them...then you won't have everyone saying how you're trying to get out of working or something too. You can even tell your boss that this is the reason you're giving your notice so early. And if you still feel guilty, is it possible for you to partially help out with a project? I have no idea what your job and work is like, so I don't know if everything's an ongoing thing or if you can work on something and then someone else pick up the end when you have to leave.

  10. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    52
    If you're concerned about them letting you go early if you give them 2 months notice then I would wait. While I understand that you are trying to be helpful to your company and co-workers, 3-4 weeks notice is still sufficient and at the same time allows you to cover your own back as well. And when your co-workers come to you with projects, just tell them no. If they need an explanation simply say you have too much on your plate right now and you're sorry you can't. They shouldn't need more than that.

    Good luck!

  11. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Celery City, MI
    Posts
    278
    Sometimes fate intervenes for you.

    I just got a call informing me that someone I was on equal status with here got bumped up two levels in the ranks, and now she's going to be my boss's boss. I won't get into whether I think she's capable or not, but I will say I certainly refuse to answer to her!!

    This is definitely some fuel for my getting-out-of-here fire. I am going to feel a lot less guilty when I do get the guts to resign. Probably next week.


 
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