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  1. #31
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    What's really scary is the idea that there's really no stopping the greenhouse effect now. Because we've heated up the Arctic, norhtern Canada, norhtern Russia, etc. we're exposing more and more ground with lots of rotting wood, producing methane--another greenhouse gas. Also, water vapor is a greenhouse gas, and now that's going up on its own because it's so hot. At some point, possibly already passed, we might set off a nasty feedback loop.

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  3. #32
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    Most people don't even know what's going on with our gov't, because they hide things. SOo it would be good to remember that it's not really the american people doing all that crap. Our gov't is doing a lot of it for us, and there's not really much we can do about it.
    Actually, I think most people don't know what's going on with the government because most people simply don't care. Sure they hide things from us, but you'd be surprised at just how much information about the daily goings-on of Washington is public information.

    We just don't want to admit our individual culpability. How many people preface their consumption defense with, "I do my part, I recycle"? We think throwing our soda cans into a recycling bin is enough, because few of us really want to take a hard look at our lifestyle and realize just how much excessive consumption we've engaged in.

  4. #33
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    skamokawa, WA
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    how many of us are aware of where our electricity comes from, ie, how it's derived? Coal, natural gas, hydro, wind, am I missing any? oh, yeah, solar.
    How many of us know how recycling is done, and in what countries the processing takes place?
    I know I don't know the answers to these questions.
    It is so hard to go against the grain and stop consuming as much as we are accustomed to. I will go for the packaging if I have to have that particular thing for fixing dinner.
    I have practiced living austerely at times in my life, and I tell you, I feel like a hobbit when I am living close with less waste and producing more of my fuel needs (for cooking etc.) there is nothing wrong with living like a hobbit, but it does make partcipating in the larger economy difficult when you busy yourself with the small details.
    We have to move faster to get more accomplished, and if we slow down, our lives may take on a quality that we find meaningful in a way we have been missing, but you just don't make as much money living that way.

    So how do we make a shift? If more people slow down, critical mass will begin forming. This is how I see craft as being a form of activism. We take time to produce more of our stuff. But how is this going to continue to create deeper change? What is the next step? Green capitalism doesn't seem like enough.

    I'm off to check out redefining craft.

  5. #34
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    New York Times Science Section had an article today debunking some anti-global warming claims, it summarized the findings of three studies featured in the Science this month.:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/08/12/sc...mate.long.html

  6. #35
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    georgia
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    thanks for the article brdgt - i'm heading over to read & attempt digest the associated studies :)

  7. #36
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    Nov 2004
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    Lex Vegas, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by chem
    I will just quickly add to the excellent arguments above that in any area in which you discuss the science behind something there will never be absolute proof. Science proves nothing, all it can do, all it is designed to do, is draw the best available conclusions from the data. The more data you have that supports a theory the more you come to believe that the theory may be pretty close to reality. This is just anoth instance of the orwellian b*llsh*t of american culture, using the language of science incorrectly to discount conclusions you dont like. If you want someone to tell you they know what is TRUE then go to church, if you want conclusions based on fact and data and drawn without prejudice (to the best of the researchers ability) then look to science.
    i would just like to say that this quote makes my scientific-method-loving nerd self very happy. so many americans (and seriously, to be fair, probably just ::people:: in general) get through years of school and come out knowing the steps of the method, but they don't know how to apply it to real life. if what you're reading claims to ::prove:: anything, it's not science. science can only disprove, and aid in drawing reasonable, logical conclusions about things.

    also, related to this issue in some ways (it delves intot hsi subject a little bit), i recently read an awesome book about the cultural effects of global climate change called "Floods, Famines, and Emperors : El Nino and the Fate of Civilizations" by brian fagen. it also goes into some documented cases of human activity affecting weather patterns and the effects of weather patterns. i highly recommend it to anyone interested in the effects of climate change in any respect.

  8. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowgraffiti220
    also, related to this issue in some ways (it delves intot hsi subject a little bit), i recently read an awesome book about the cultural effects of global climate change called "Floods, Famines, and Emperors : El Nino and the Fate of Civilizations" by brian fagen. it also goes into some documented cases of human activity affecting weather patterns and the effects of weather patterns. i highly recommend it to anyone interested in the effects of climate change in any respect.
    Thanks for the recommendation and for helping to remind me of a book I read a few years ago on the subject, Something New Under the Sun: An Environmental History of the Twentieth-Century World. It won the 2001 World History Association Book Award.


 
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