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  1. #1
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    Pet's teeth cleaned?

    Anyone ever had their pet's teeth cleaned?
    I grew up with dogs and never heard of this, but just recently my vet recommended a cleaning for my own dog. They did a "wellness" program on her and she's healthy and they estimate she's only around 5-6 years old (not sure since she was a stray before I got her). The thing that freaks me out is that they have to put her to sleep to do the cleaning and while they assured me that it had been six years since they lost a pet during a cleaning -- I'm getting more and more nervous as the day approaches (Monday). My dog is like my child so if something happened to her during this procedure I would never forgive myself.

    Your experiences with this might help calm my nerves, or not if you lost a pet. Help?

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  3. #2
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    hey blumen,
    Three of my dogs (over the years) have had their teeth cleaned. One was out for surgery for something else already and the other two needed teeth removed when I got them as rescues. One was very old and had congestive heart failure, but she came through with flying colors. She had some bad teeth that were painful, but it still was not an easy decision to have it done.

    I'm not crazy about having them put out either, but I think can actually help to prolong their lives by preventing infections.

    Good luck on Monday!

  4. #3
    Senior Member
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    Look at it this way, your dogs risk increases as he gets older, therefore it's better to do it now than later.

  5. #4
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    dental care is really important for pets. if their teeth get tartar buildup, the gunk can harbor bacteria that can affect your pet's whole body, leading to systemic bacterial infections, heart disease, etc. not to mention it's what causes "dog breath". the anaesthesia risk is extremely tiny compared to the risk of long-term health problems caused by tartar buildup or rotten teeth.

    the light anaesthesia vets use for dental work is really safe. it's only dangerous for pets that are old, hugely obese, or have other health issues. my mom does dental care on dogs and cats at work every day, and she has never had a pet die. a responsible vet will run blood tests and do a health exam to make sure your dog is up to the anaesthesia before they do the dental.

  6. #5
    Senior Member
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    Also after you get the teeth cleaning at the vet you can do regular brushing by yourself. They offer doggy teeth care kits at the petstore.

    my vet told me that those are great for at home care.

    I got the one with the toothbush with a small brush on one end and a large one at the other. and also a finger rubber bristle brush.

    The Doggy Tooth Paste is flavored so they will love it. Let them taste the paste first so that they can find out it taste good, they will be more likey to let you brush their teeth if they know it taste good.

    Since my dog is small I found the finger brush to be the best and not to hard on her gums. The vet even said if they refuse the brushing that just rubbing it on their teeth is good enough because the enzimes in the paste do most of the work anyway its not always nessisary to brush.

    Just remember not to you human tooth paste. Flouride is posionous to dogs and since they can't spit they swallow it.

    If your uncertain about doing this call the vet for more info, or just let the vet handle it.

    Dental Bones, and things like greenies also help to keep teeth clean. So imbetween brushing times its good to get them a dental bone they can chew on and it keeps their breathe minty fresh.

  7. #6
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    Oct 2004
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    ok, I feel better now. I guess with my other dogs in the past we always gave them chewies so maybe it wasn't a problem, but my current dog has no interest in chewing on things.
    I will make sure I buy a dental kit for her to use when she is done.

    Thanks :)

  8. #7
    Junior Member
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    Apr 2005
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    Texas
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    I worked at a vet for a few years, and dental cleaning is very quick. Most vets don't like to have dogs under for too long. We had two sets of dental tools so the doc could work on one side, and I could work on the other.
    I know the idea of your dog going under anesthesia is scary, but it really is for just a short time (a good doc should do it in about 15 minutes).
    The only dogs that are really at risk are older dogs (over 10), very young puppies, dogs with heart murmurs or heart worms, or diabetic animals.
    She will be fine, and she will have beautiful pearly whites!

  9. #8
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    Jun 2005
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    we just had our cat's teeth done and i was really nervous too. but she was starting to get gingivitis (plus her mouth just smelled like ass) and she needed it to stay healthy. plus as they get older the anesthetic may be harder to do. you're doing the right thing. just don't freak out (um, like i did) when you get her back and she's still woozy. our cat's eyes were completely dilated for much of that night and it was a little creepy. she was also so single minded--eat, sleep, move. and just generally drugged up. but she'll be fine! and their breath is much better!

  10. #9
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    Hey, I know today is the big day. Let us know if everything went ok, and if you you and the pup are alright!

    del

  11. #10
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    Oct 2004
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    UPDATE:
    I got a call about an hour ago telling me that the cleaning went well and she didn't need to have any teeth pulled. They said she was just beginning to wake up and they have her sitting in the front office with the staff because she's such a sweet, well behaved girl. I can't wait to pick her up after work!

    Thanks again!


 
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