Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 46

Thread: Fahrenheit 9/11

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Biggest Little City in the World
    Posts
    267

    Fahrenheit 9/11

    I haven't seen it yet but thought there should be a discussion started. So who's seen it (Xuli? Mishy?) and what did you think?

  2. # ADS

  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    sittin' on the dock of the bay
    Posts
    749
    Oooh, I've tried *twice* (Friday and Saturday) and it's been sold out (which both pissed me off and made me really, really happy). I'll come back and post once I've seen it, but for now I'm going to avoid this thread in case of spoilers ...

  4. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Hell's Kitchen
    Posts
    209

    I'm still exhausted

    I saw it Friday night, and I'm still not sure if I can articulate my feelings about it.

    I cried throughout this film, but the first time was before the opening credits, when members of the House of Representatives from Florida were, one by one, going before the joint session of Congress and asking for one Senator to sign their petitions to open Bush's presidency to debate. No one signed. I didn't know that happened and I was moved by their bravery and conviction.

    I loved the handling of the American troops in Iraq - this film very sympathetic to them, focusing the blame for abuses and atrocities on the policymakers and not the men and women serving our country. I left with the impression that, wherever one's loyalties lie, it cannot be argued that Moore did right by those who enlisted in the armed forces. That said, it reaffirmed my commitment to peace and pacifism. And on a selfish note, I appreciated that he brings to light that people who protest war are protesting the policies and decisionmakers that call for war, not the troops themselves.

    I have mixed feelings about Michael Moore. While I agree with most of his politics, I am skeptical of the way he arrives at his conclusions. Even still, the film renewed my anger and saddness over what I view as a hijacking of our electoral process and the way our leaders will do whatever it takes to keep their cronies happy, even leading us into a war for oil and lying to us about it.

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    NOLA
    Posts
    185
    I saw the movie on Friday as well. My strongest initial reaction to it was hate and anger at the Bush administration/family. There were quite a few things presented in the movie that I had no idea had happened, as well as some things that I got pissed of about all over again.

    What I really liked was the way that he showed the members of the Armed Services as really motivated and ready to fight for freedom in the beginning of the war and then increasingly tired and disenchanted as time went on. What struck me possibly the most was the Marine who said he will refuse to go on another tour of duty in Iraq because he "doesn't want to kill anymore poor people".

    At times Moore's confrontational and mocking tactics make me uncomfortable, but perhaps that is a good thing. I was definitely more comfortable than the Congresspeople he tried to ambush outside of the Capitol. I also think that he will never be as mean or callous as many of the right-wings biggest mouths such as Rush Limbaugh and Ann Coulter.

    For the most part Farenheit 9/11 is just going to be preaching to the choir because hardcore conservatives/Republicans are not going to see it or be swayed by it. My biggest hope for this movie is that people drag their friends who are on the fence about Bush and the Iraq war to it.

  6. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,563
    Quote Originally Posted by danielepea
    For the most part Farenheit 9/11 is just going to be preaching to the choir because hardcore conservatives/Republicans are not going to see it or be swayed by it. My biggest hope for this movie is that people drag their friends who are on the fence about Bush and the Iraq war to it.
    Howard Stern had Michael Moore on Friday and is running a contest where you send in your ticket stub and get entered in a contest to attend a party at a strip club with Howard and Michael. Considering the the Stern voting bloc (I kid you not, there was an article in the New York Times this weekend about it) is predominantly Republican and first time voters - exactly the ones that Bush cannot afford to lose, this could have an effect on the election.

    Edited to add the article:

    A Shock Jock Voting Bloc?
    By JOHN TIERNEY

    SWING voters may be in relatively short supply this year, but they definitely exist, and a surprising number of them may be listening to Howard Stern on their way to church.

    A new analysis found that 21 percent of voters were either undecided or so tentatively committed to one presidential candidate that they would be willing to reconsider. That is low compared with the share of voters up for grabs at this point in past elections - 33 percent in 2000, 27 percent in 1996 and 31 percent in 1992 - but enough to give one candidate a decisive victory.

    "People have been saying that this election will be a repeat of what we saw four years ago, but there is still a sizable number of voters with a favorable view of both candidates," said Andrew Kohut, the director of the nonpartisan Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, which conducted the analysis. "The election might be close, but a candidate who did a really good job of reaching these persuadable voters could win by a gap of five percentage points or more."

    Unfortunately for Republicans, a lot of these voters tune their radios to Mr. Stern, who has been crusading to oust President Bush. Mr. Stern is angry at the Federal Communications Commission, which cracked down on stations that broadcast a show of his that discussed anal sex and what the commission called "repeated flatulence sound effects."

    Mr. Stern, who has backed Republican candidates in the past, has a mother lode of swing voters in his audience, according to a poll by the New Democrat Network, an advocacy group. Its pollster, Mark Penn, calculates that this "Stern Gang" of swing voters makes up 4 percent of the likely voters this year, nearly as large as the entire Hispanic vote in 2000.

    But one bit of solace for Republicans is that Mr. Stern's listeners go to church frequently, which tends to correlate with voting Republican. The poll showed that Mr. Stern's listeners were slightly more likely than nonlisteners to call themselves born-again Christians and were three times more likely to attend church daily. The pollsters did not ask why they went to church after listening to Mr. Stern, so there is no way to calculate how many were performing an act of contrition.

  7. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    sittin' on the dock of the bay
    Posts
    749
    I finally saw it. I feel like I have to start out by confessing my unabashed adoration of Michael Moore, which doesn't necessarily mean that I accept everything he says naively or without questioning ... just that I trust his politics and his intentions, and that I never agree with *anyone* 100%, so obviously I'm not going to agree with him. I don't get people who say that they like Moore's message but not him, or that they agree with his message but not his tactics -- to me, Roger & Me is one of the best movies ever made, and I think he is a crucial voice in the world. We need a radical public voice -- just as we need voices of all perspectives speaking publicly in the world -- and I think that without Michael Moore a lot of necessary things would go unarticulated.

    Now for the movie itself, which will pretty much consist of disconnected thoughts ...

    Well, I cried pretty much throughout. I was glad for the structure of the movie, because I would start crying and then start laughing, then start crying again, etc. It was nice not to be crying continuously. In particular, Lila Lipscomb had me in tears pretty much every time she was onscreen. What an amazing woman. I hope we get to hear more from her in contexts outside of Moore's work -- she was so articulate and passionate and forceful.

    I was very proud that Cynthia McKinney showed up in the line of Representatives who tried to get a senator to sign the documents that would have opened Bush's "election" to debate, as a former resident of her district, even though she isn't in the House any more.

    Other than that, I have to say that what made me angriest about the movie was that although it exposed me to emotional material I had not previously had access to (the perspective of Lila Lipscomb, the perspective of the woman whose uncle's house was bombed in Iraq, the images of suffering in Iraq), it did not expose me to any information I had not already heard in another context. I find it really disturbing that everything that was "reported" in this movie has been reported in other media before -- whether that be on CNN, in the New York Times, in magazines like The Nation, included in speeches at anti-war rallies, or whatever -- and that much of the information that was included has not made its way into public debate. I'm not saying all the facts are 100% accurate, I'm saying that they've all been reported before and have never become part of the public debate, and that all of these accusations are important enough that they should be part of the public debate. So my hope is that at least this movie will get people talking.

    It's amazing to me how difficult it has been to see this movie -- all of the shows where I live have sold out so far. I hope this is a good sign.

    Speaking to everyone who says that this movie is "preaching to the choir" and will not be seen by a wider audience -- I'm actually not so sure that's true. I was discussing this with a friend of mine, and one of the really insightful things she said to me was that the best thing that could have happened was Disney's refusal to distribute this movie, because if there's one place where Americans can be relied on to really do the right thing it's under conditions where they are told what they can and can't see. Americans don't stand for being told that some images are inappropriate for them. So hopefully that cultural dynamic will help get this movie a wider audience.

  8. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Little Rhody
    Posts
    112
    Well my boyfriend and I went to the movie theatre at 5:00pm to buy tickets for his entire family for the 9:35 show. He convinced his dad, a conservative Bush voting news paper believing guy, to come with us. He refused to believe the movie was true. As my boyfriend's little sister said, it must be like having someone tell people god doesn't exist giving back up evidence and then the people refusing to believe it. Man she is smart for a 15 year old!

    The movie did exactly what it should have done, started people talking and debating and (dun dun dunnn) thinking.

    I hope lots of people see it, I hope his movie helped start a revolution of thinking educated voters!

  9. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    893
    This has been so interesting.....reading these responses. (See how many people have viewed this thread!) I haven't seen it yet, but it is supposed to be on for four weeks and the cinema up the street.

    I wanted to ask sewing stars - did you mean that your FIL refused to believe it was true even after he saw it? How interesting. There are a lot of people in denial, I think. We should all be skeptical, probably, but simply refusing to face facts is another thing entirely.

  10. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Little Rhody
    Posts
    112
    Yeah, he thought that Micheal Moore staged things like the scene with the woman in DC talking to the woman in the tent, and the other woman coming up to her saying it was fake. (As my boyfriend pointed the woman who thought it was fake probably thought so since there was a camera crew standing there.)

    His father refuses to see things from other people's shoes, and it may be easier for him to write off the whole thing as something that wasn't true or real than face the fact that the man he voted for and believed in is not what he says he is, or that the news paper's account of events wasn't correct. Which is sad, really. Especially since he actually goes out and votes.

    I have to hand it to my boyfriend for trying though!

  11. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    sittin' on the dock of the bay
    Posts
    749
    Sewing Stars -- that's interesting about your father in law. I actually saw some people walk out of the movie when I went (in a way that made it obvious they were walking out, not just going to the bathroom or whatever) and it made me kind of curious. Maybe I'm just a totally stingy cheapass Scrooge, but I can't imagine walking out of *anything* after I'd paid $9 to see it ... not even something with the Olson twins. I wanted to ask them what motivated them to just leave like that. The only thing I could really think of (which, I know, is quite ungenerous) is that I guess some people just really don't like being asked to *think*.


 
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Remove Ads

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

what is the best fahrenheit for cold pepsi

Click on a term to search for related topics.