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  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    2,021
    i'd just like to mention that nicotine itself IS an extremely potent toxin. It's an alkaloid. Doses as low as 0.88 mg/kg have been observed to be lethal in adults, and babies have died from drinking milk that a cigarette had accidentally fallen into.

    polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are one of the main carcinogens in cigarette smoke, and they are formed by any combustion of organic material. so the carcinogens in any type of tobacco smoke are going to be the same as in cigarettes.

    incidentally, snuff is is just as addictive as smoking tobacco and can cause mouth ulcers and had been linked to oral cancer... as much as the tobacco industry would like us to think that snuff and chewing tobacco are safe, they're probably not. www.cdc.gov has a lot of information about it.

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  3. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    4
    I've stopped smoking twice. The first time, I quit after smoking for 11 years. I used the patch and I was surprised how easy it was for me to quit finally. I had tried previously and failed a number of times, but all of a sudden, it was easy.

    I stayed smoke free for about 3 years and then started again EXACTLY the way you mentioned. I had ONE cigarette and before I knew it I was back to a pack a day and it took me several more attempts and almost 5 years to quit again. It's now been 8 months and I'm feeling very proud of myself. But again, this time, it was easy. I don't know what the difference was between all the times I failed and the two times I was successful (is quitting for three years a "success").

    I do know what the two successes had in common. In both cases, I really made a commitment to change my life. To become more healthy. I started running (I decided I was going to run a marathon...I've done a half-marathon, but I'm still working on the 26.2). I used nicotine inhalers for a couple of months, which I LOVED! I could fiddle with them like cigarettes and even though I missed the visual effect of seeing the smoke (have you ever smoked in a dark room? Boring). I also used Welbutrin this time and I suppose it helped, but I stopped taking it after a couple months, as well. I felt like it was making me depressed (even though it's technically an anti-depressent).

    I agree with a lot of the advice here. Tell people. Find a friend who is quitting, too! I had a friend at work who would ask me about once a week how I was doing and vice-versa. Do something completely different. Train for a marathon or a 5K. Do NOT substitute chewing tobacco or snuff or pipe tobacco. All are addictive and as unsafe as cigarettes. And know that you CAN do it. It does get easier. I still walk outside after eating a great meal once in a while and get that craving, but it passes fast and I kind of laugh about it. Congratulations!!!

  4. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    215
    I haven't read many of the posts but to help curb the cravings you could try ginger and / or rooibos tea (or red tea). These have both been found to help reduce nicotine cravings. If you don't go cold turkey, changing your habits one at a time could help. Most smokers will pick up a cig when on the phone, with coffee or tea, when someone else lights up, while drinking alcohol or riding in a car. When you have a craving wait 5 minutes and hope it goes away.

    The most disturbing thing I ever saw was when I found out my mother had lung cancer. I started to mention it to some friends and immediately every smoker lit up one. Ew!

    I smoked one full cigarette in my life when I was in high school. As soon as I finished I wanted another. I decided that there was no way in hell I would smoke another. Luckily I never picked up the habbit. Good luck or should I say good will, you will need a lot of it.

    Tomico

  5. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    State College, PA
    Posts
    212
    I quit a bunch of times and the 3 week mark was always when I started back. Until just over 8 years ago. I haven't looked back.

    Here are a few of my personal pointers, but YMMV, of course.
    1) Have cigs available, just don't smoke them. When I had no cigs in the house, all I could think about was going to the store to GET more. When I quit for good, I had 1/2 a pack on me. Then it was an empowering CHOICE I made not to smoke, not simply something I couldn't do because I had nothing to smoke.

    2) change the rules. You can no longer smoke at the computer, or inside, or wherever you tend to smoke the most. My husband refused to let me smoke in the house, and by November, it was just too cold for this new Southern transplant to smoke outdoors in PA.

    3) Be aware of how much pocket change you suddenly have. You don't have to save up oodles and go on a cruise, but it's nice to have the extra money so you can treat yourself to something you need, like lunch when you're out or milk on the way home from work, without writing a check or getting out the debit card.

    4) Look at other people who smoke and how silly or trashy or low-class or ugly or ______ (fill in the blank with your appropriate discouraging adjective). You don't want to look like that, do you?

    Hope these help someone. THey worked for me.

  6. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    215
    My mom and her husband decided to give up smoking together when they found out my mom had lung cancer. My mom pointed out that they should but the money asside in a savings account so that they could see how much they were saving. She said they spent about $130 a week 4 years ago and that was before the huge price jump. They are still saving the money. I'm not sure what they plan on doing with it, but is a nice little nest egg.
    It is a lot nicer to go over and visit, now. I hated smelling like smoke all the time.

    Tomico

  7. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    347
    I haven't smoked but both of my parents smoked and they quit about 10 years ago using the patch.

    Another thing on of my friends did was eat a lot of mints. She said they made her mouth feel clean and she hated "dirtying her mouth" if that makes any sense.

  8. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo
    Posts
    6
    well, it's been almost three weeks since I chose health. Since then I've had 9 cigarettes, and since I tried to quit cold turkey and had been smoking a pack a day, I am pretty damn happy with that number. The times I find myself smoking are when I'm out and have had a few drinks, and as long as I can keep it to just one, I'm okay with occasionally having one, because I do really like smoking from time to time. I just hate that black lung feeling you get after waking up from a night out, you know? so anyway, that's how things are going so far. I can't really feel the difference physically, but I guess these things take time. Thanks for all the support!

    Jamie

  9. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    99
    Why smoke cigars
    Many people enjoy only smoking in the air. But then what pleasure can be obtained if you do not drag out? Cigar smoking is a real art that you need to get used to for a long time. Below we will tell you what cigars are for:
    Part of the image. One can hardly imagine an influential person without a cigar and his own cabinet; many people smoke them in order to emphasize their status.
    Taste. Despite the fact that a person smokes not in a puff, he can enjoy the rich taste of tobacco. Nicotine consumption. The person who smokes cigars develops a habit and can no longer live without nicotine. Relaxation. In order to smoke cigars, many people devote time to this process and consider it a hobby. For most, this is necessary for relaxation and rest. Interesting information for cigar smokers here https://smokeprofy.com/blog/how-to-light-a-cigar/

  10. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    54
    Hello! Quitting smoking is really very difficult. Often, even if a person quit smoking, sooner or later he returns to this addiction.
    Personally, I smoked for 15 years and tried to quit many times, but I didn’t succeed, so I decided to start smoking cigars, because they are less harmful, contain less tar and carcinogens. The only problem is that certain conditions are needed for storing cigars, so I was forced to buy a large humidor
    This thing is very useful for cigars because it does not spoil it. If you smoke cigars, then you definitely need to buy this!

  11. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    12
    Thanks for telling this story.


 
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