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  1. #11
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    Jul 2004
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    46
    we just recenly rented a beach house for vacation and one girl who came brought all these paper plates and cups and stuff, eventhough the kitchen was fully stocked with more than enough dishes, it bugged me.

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  3. #12
    Senior Member
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    Apr 2004
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    Wisconsin
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    1,563
    Man, I am just too cheap to participate in "disposable culture." I rip up old t-shirts for rags and use them to clean windows instead of using paper towels!

  4. #13
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    Jun 2004
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    Pacific NW
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    When I was growing up in the '70s, my Mom was working on research involving city dumps and landfill in regards to chemical residue run - off. She was so freaked out that our house went thru an entire non-disposable transformation. Also during that time were water and gas shortages, so I count myself lucky that I just learned all that conservation stuff at an early age. I was always appalled at younger roomates wastefulness. To this day I take 3 min. showers (as a kid we had to take a kitchen timer into the bathroom for showers - you learn real quick how to clean your whole bod and wash your hair in 3 min.). Kitchen rags instead of paper towels. Panty hose can be reused for so many things, as can old socks. Glass refillable milk jugs. Refillable shampoo and lotions (there was a great shop that would add any number of scents to the basic stuff). We even went to the PopShoppe - remember that anyone? The list goes on and on.
    The one and only disposable item you can't tear away from me (to this day I have to hide them when my Mom comes over) are my shavers - sorry, can't stand the electric ones - don't want roomates questioning me on what's going on in the bathroom.

  5. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    103
    it's a hard habit to break for me.

    lately though when i wash my hands i'd just use the dishcloth to dry off, which saved a lot of paper. (not to mention a lot of money!)

    but i'm a neat freak when it comes to my kitchen, and in turn i use a lot of paper towels cuz they're more sanitary when doing food prep and stuff.

    i <3 swiffers though. esp. the wet stuff. cuz it means i don't have to carry around a 10-pound bucket full of water while i do the floors.

    i'm pretty good when it comes to paper goods though.

    jangrl

  6. #15
    Senior Member
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    May 2004
    Location
    NoVa
    Posts
    117
    The sad thing about disposible culture is it leaches in an "I dont care as long as I dont have to look at it" attitude. Of course you want to be free of baby poo as soon as possible but are disposable diapers really worth it? Yes, baby poo is a pain but so are the sick and elderly people that are locked into hospitals becuase they are an inconvenience to the family. Whoa, did I say that?
    Its inconvenient to wash and reuse things?? I personally would rather run down to the washing machine with a load of rags than have to run to the store for more paper products. Now they have disposible teeth cleaning wipes, Im sure soon enough Ill see them in the litter on the side of the road. If your throwing it away, you might as well throw it out on your lawn. (that is sarcasm but it not uncommon)
    Just because its in the trash doesnt mean its gone. think about how much trash you make, now imagine the garbage man didnt come for 1 month and you had to store that trash in your house. I think people would learn really fast how to reuse, compost, reduce, buy less packaging etc. How much time does one actually save using disposible? does it even break even the amount of time you lose by buying disposibles? (by working longer hours to have the money and the time to go shopping every three days)
    Im sorry to sound preachy, this is my hot button topic. I think the way my culture lives is opressive. Everything has to be bigger, shiny, newer and faster. Everything else is pitched, things (including people) fall through the cracks and people can see the value of things unless they have big flashing lights. People cant see the value of things unless a tv commercial says its valuable. I blame disposible product on the poor getting poorer (the movie super-size me touched on this in regards to fast-food) Disposible posible products were made for those times when you arent able to use conventional products. Draining greasy bacon on a cloth napkin wouldnt really work but drying water off your hands with a towel instead of a wad of paper towels would.
    Ill' get off my soap box now, and get to some suggestions
    Rags made from ratty shirts and towels,
    cloth napkins can be made from ratty non-knit mens shirt backs or fabric scraps
    refill hotel shampoos instead of buying sample sizes for travel
    keep a small pad of paper to make notes from online instead of printing everything that interests you. print on both side
    carry reusable grocery bags in your car or if your buying a small item, tuck it in your purse
    if your offered a promotional item that you dont need/want dont take it. (if someone on the street is handing out flyers dont take it them throw it on the ground. I will take one, look at it, and if Im not interested I will hand it back)
    and my personal favorites, try to pick up 1 piece of litter in the parking lot (there is almost always a trashcan in front of stores and such) If someone sees you they may think about thier own actions. or if someone is astonished becuase you are washing a re-useable lunch container in the employee bathroom just let them know that its not worth the hassle to use "convenience" products)

  7. #16
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    Jul 2004
    Location
    Centennial, Colorado
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    55
    Unless I'm going to be eating out of my toilet bowl, I could care less how many germs are in it, as long as it's cleanish.

    I'm trying to be better about this stuff: I try to avoid buying kitchy knick knack stuff for myself. I've been knitting cotton dish cloths. I use cloths for cleaning as much as possible. The newspaper gets read on-line.

    It's hard though. I have oodles of books I could have just as easily gotten from the library. I give away bags of crap to Goodwill every few months. But I am getting better about limiting my consumption.

    What chaps my ass though is people who just plain waste. In my apartment complex, some assholes stuffed a couch into the dumpster, along with a desk and a dresser. The dumpster is taller than I am, so it took effort to get it up in there. They could have easily left it next to the dumpster and someone would have taken it happily. But just to be spitefull, they stuck it in the dumpster. Grrrr....

  8. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    811
    Stprcsm, I do the pick up one thing in the parking lot deal, too. I think it started with going to the beach as a little kid. My mother made us look around for any stuff we may have dropped, and I started picking up other people's trash, too. I trained my nieces and nephews without really trying.

    I reuse and recycle a lot, but not as much as I used to. Very busy and tired of the fight, I guess. But I reuse my lunch bags and spoons, use handtowels in the house and rags for all sorts of things.

    The thing that gets me is that we have so many people try to be ecofriendly, and yet more items are coming out in smaller units with lots of packaging.

    No time to maintain a compost pile these days, but I still put some stuff on a heap that doesn't get turned.

    I really wanted to try a composting toilet, but no partners ever were willing.

  9. #18
    Guest
    I don't think disposable culture is as prevalent in the UK, but we are getting catching up.

    I'd never even heard of disposable toilet brushes until now, and I thought it was a joke when I first read it. (Personally I just squirt some bleach in the bottom of the holder and let that do it's job).

    With the exception of paper towel in the kitchen for putting greasy foods on I use cloths for everything. I just wash them as and when needed.
    I clean my windows with the free newspaper I get through the door.


    It's strange, I was reading a very old Reader's Digest Childrens Annual last week and one of the essays in it was about how in the future everything will be made of paper and easily disposible, from clothes to household cleaning items. Normally I laugh at 1950s predictions for the future (the silver foil clothing never took off did it) but this was spot on.

  10. #19
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    Jul 2004
    Location
    Centennial, Colorado
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    55
    I guess I wonder *why* everything's become so disposable, more specifically, what do people have against things old and reused? I have a dresser that I've had longer than I've been alive, and I love it and value it because of the memories it brings. My mother has old quilts that are falling to shreds with age, but she still uses and loves them because her great aunt sewed them by hand. My mother in law gave me a quilt she got at Foley's and I was sort of disappointed, because it has no history or memory. Of course, this is a woman who probably replaces her entire household contents over ten year periods.

    Why do we run from things with history?

  11. #20
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    Jul 2004
    Posts
    46
    A few other things. I have been using cloth grocery sacks and they can hold so much more stuff! I also try to have a bag or something when we go the the park or beach, and before we leave we try and do a clean sweep, really great when you have lots of drunks, just line them up and tell them to pick up anything that didn't grow there.


 
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