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  1. #1
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    Disposable culture

    Someone brought this up in another thread, and it's been something that's been on my mind for awhile. We live in a culture where everything is becoming disposable. The latest is disposable toilet scrubbers. Whats up with that?! I understand the matter of convienance and that they may in fact be biodegradable, but what about all those disposabel razors, diapers, forks, plates, napkins, clorox clean wipes, dish sponges, etc. It terrifies me that in 100 years or so my home might be built on a landfilll, or that we may figure out a way to dump our trash in space. My question is what are some of the ways that you used non disposable stuff instead on the disposable. I've started using dish cloths that I can wash rathar than papertowels or sponges. How bout you??

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  3. #2
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    it's frightening how much we take for granted. the whole cheap plastic crap from walmart (or anywhere, for that matter) trend is leading us to fill up the planet with stuff that breaks after a short period of use so that we have to continue buying the same thing over and over. appliances and cars, for example, used to be built to last, but manufacturers figured out there was more profit in using plastic parts that need to be replaced frequently.

    other cultures value things that last. furniture is passed down through generations as heirlooms. in general, people spend a fair amount of money on something they need, and then they don't need to keep spending for the same thing. if it's made well, it lasts. if it's from walmart, you're probably going to end up spending quite a bit more than the price tag because you'll have to buy more of the same thing when it breaks/rips, etc.

  4. #3
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    I get so angry at people, and this is a tad irrational, who buy me things like picture frames or candles or, in the case of a terrible birthday from my father, a business card holder you can hang on the wall.

    I'd rather not get a gift than receive a bunch of candles that I'll give away or throw away. I hate living in a house full of junk, and I refuse to buy stuff that I may not necessarily need. Lately, I've been talking myself almost out of everything, if I don't really need it.

    I don't see why people can't use the same toilet brush. It's not going to kill them. We use the same toilet brush for awhile before buying a new one, and my rear end is still firmly attached.

  5. #4
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    I'd rather have someone donate $5 to a charity instead of buying me some crappy "no thought put into it" gift. I admit that I'm somewhat of a dipsosable type of girl, I haven't gone as far as the toilet brush. I am trying to cut down on the amount of disposable stuff I buy and recycle more. It helps that we just moved to a place where once a week they pick up the recycling. I've stopped buy individual wrapped stuff. I usually buy the bigger thing and dole it out into serving sizes then reuse the baggies if I can. Someday I'm going to get around to making cloth napkins so we can sto using so many papertowels.

  6. #5
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    yeah I'm papertowel junkie. I always get the recycled, but I should use cloth instead.

  7. #6
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    Honestly, I'm trying to come to terms and find a balance in my life with the disposable/reusable issue. Working at a coffee shop has definitely helped me appreciate the occasional necessity of just throwing stuff away even if it's not entirely used up. Sometimes, having an orderly and uncluttered space (particularly when you're sharing it with others) is more important.

    My initial instinct (due to how I was raised, I guess) is to save everything - Don't throw that away; someday you could make something out of it! - resulting in a house cluttered with junk I'll never use. For instance, empty soy milk cartons can become sock-drawer dividers, or I can send them to my mom to use in making her gingerbread houses - and the little plastic spouts make good spools for embroidery floss. But finally I noticed I just had a dozen soy milk cartons lying around the house. I was never going to cut them up for drawer dividers, my mom has enough milk cartons already, and I seldom embroider. I had to force myself just to crush the damn things and throw them away.

    With cleaning products, I'm generally on the other end of the spectrum, though. The thought of re-using a gross, nasty, crud-filled cloth or sponge disgusts me - I just picture all that filth getting spread around rather than removed. But I don't want to be wasteful with my cleaning supplies, so I end up not cleaning as much as I should. I've finally concluded that if it weren't for various kinds of disposable wipes, my house wouldn't get cleaned at all - and that justifies their use for me. I actually might look into those disposable toilet-brush thingies. I agree the idea sounds silly, but they might be the only way I'll ever have a clean toilet.

  8. #7
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    I think thats why i decided to go with cloth towels for cleaning,. that way i can use them and then throw them in the wash, and then use them again. Rather than use a sponge that gets all gross.

  9. #8
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    I think I kind of like the idea of using dish cloths... even if it does mean more laundry (I don't really have that many whites anyway)!

    Right now I think I am in the middle as far as disposable culture goes. I recognize that our society is getting carried away with products you can "just toss", but I am also a woman of limited means and limited time. So while I do shop at thrift stores and use cloth towels rather than paper towels, I still really enjoy cheap clothes from H&M and doing the floors with my Swiffer.

  10. #9
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    I feel really guilty reading this thread. Although I mended a lot of my ways, I grew up with disposible paper plates, plastic ware, and plastic cups. (My grandfather may be in part to blame for so much plastic in the world, he helped develop some of the many types of plastics we use, although the harder plastics like for molded chairs.)

    I have since collected a bunch of 50's dishes, glasses, and silverware. But my dad always tells me when I am home that he wastes water washing the dishes, an argument I just can't buy into...

  11. #10
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    Those miracle cloth/ microfiber thingies helped us reduce paper towel consumption. I've even seen them at the dollar store lately. They soak up so much more water and remove more dirt than paper.


 
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