Page 2 of 10 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 95
  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    2,021
    ugh, i temporarily forgot about that. yep, they are still pushing formula in 3rd world countries because women here finally wised the hell up and started breastfeeding again. even in the US, doctors used to get kickbacks from companies that made formula if they recommended it to new mothers as being better than breast milk and so forth.

  2. # ADS

  3. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    NSW, Australia
    Posts
    583
    Quote Originally Posted by stella
    animal-tested products- i don't buy them, but i do use pharmaceuticals, so i guess i'm hypocritical there.
    I don't think thats hypocritical so much as making a statement about your priorities or values. It's your choice to believe that animal testing is of value for pharmaceuticals but not for cosmetics. Many would agree with you and those with a different opinion would respect your right to have yours.

    I feel overwhelmed by all the things people choose to boycott! But I really like threads like this one because they really help me to think, reflect on my choices and act a bit more purposefully. And I like learning about why people act as they do, and I like knowing that there are people so consciously living their lives.

  4. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    2,021
    i actually don't think that animal testing is of much value for pharmaceuticals at all. it's an archaic system that has a huge amount of infrastructure built up to support it, and companies do not want to invest the time and money in developing the alternatives that are already known to exist. from a toxicological standpoint, animal testing is exceedingly limited in value, simply because animal results do not extrapolate well to humans. ahem.

    there are companies that i avoid because i just don't like their products, but i think that's different from boycotting a company for a political or ethical reason.

    i don't mind Starbucks. they are a reasonably decent employer, but i wish they would switch to fair trade and/or organic coffee. there are a lot of independant coffee shops or local chains here, and i've tried them all. one place has coffee i like and good service, but the rest have shitty coffee or terrible service. if i am going to get a cup of coffee that tastes like roasted tires served to me by a smug hipster asshole at the local place, i'd rather go to Starbucks and get a reasonably decent cup of coffee from a polite, or at least unmemorable, employee. but i'm a crabby old lady like that.

  5. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    283
    I'm not sure there's anything that I actively boycott, but there are defenitely places I try to avoid at all costs, mostly department stores. I'm also really against Starbucks because they seem to be cropping up everywhere in my town, and I wish they would wish to organic/free trade as well. Honestly, if Starbucks wasn't EVERYWHERE I wouldnt' be so against them.

    I'm trying to move toward making whatever I cannot buy second hand or from independant vendors. It's a slower process than I realized however.

  6. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    knoxville, tn
    Posts
    39
    Nike (as well as most major sneaker makers), WalMart, Exxon, fast food restaurants (though I do occasionally have some Taco Bell), coffee that isn't fair trade, Kraft foods and Nabisco (owned by Philip Morris tobacco), Proctor & Gamble (animal testing), Cracker Barrel (my aunt told me that they won't hire homosexuals would rather pay a settlement than deny it)

    I had no idea that the diamond mining industry was so bad. Luckily, I've never owned any and probably never will; being poor has an advantage!

  7. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,563
    Quote Originally Posted by stella
    ugh, i temporarily forgot about that. yep, they are still pushing formula in 3rd world countries because women here finally wised the hell up and started breastfeeding again. even in the US, doctors used to get kickbacks from companies that made formula if they recommended it to new mothers as being better than breast milk and so forth.
    Formula vs. Breast Milk in non-western countries is a very complicated issue that goes far beyond Nestle. I recommend the chapter in Death Without Weeping by Nancy Scheper-Hughes on the cultural meaning of baby formula if you want to learn more.

  8. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    McKinney, TX
    Posts
    92
    Quote Originally Posted by happyhats

    I'm trying to move toward making whatever I cannot buy second hand or from independant vendors. It's a slower process than I realized however.
    i know what you mean....indepentant vendors are generally too expensive for me (i'm a poor college student) and making stuff requires me to borrow power tools and such from friends because i don't have the money to buy any tools beyond the basics....ho hum but the convienent thing is that my budget it so tight i really can't buy anything new from a major discount store like target or wal-mart so i'm not even tempted

  9. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    287
    Wal-Mart: Because it's ruining the world.
    Target: The whole birth control thing.
    The mall: I can get things cheaper online or used and feel better about it.
    Most fast food: Except for Subway, Dairy Queen, and Arby's (for the milkshakes), but that's mainly because I'm a vegetarian and not any kind of political statement.

  10. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    407
    Quote Originally Posted by happyhats
    Honestly, if Starbucks wasn't EVERYWHERE I wouldnt' be so against them.
    I think that's my problem with them, too. It's basically aesthetic. I feel like the world is starting to look the same wherever you go. And I'd like the coffee places in Tokyo to be just a tiny bit different from the coffee places in Dublin.

  11. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    48
    I don't actively boycott anything. I try to patronize local businesses more than huge conglomerates as much as I can but I too am a poor college student.

    I try not to buy anything tested on animals, but every list I've looked at is too conflicting for me to know whether the company tests on animals or not.

    I'm not boycotting fast food intentionally, but I never eat it. It just doesn't taste good to me.

    I do have a question about boycotts. My undestanding is people boycott a business to get them to change their business practices. If you keep boycotting them after they no longer practice those things, how is the boycott effective? What incentive is there for the business to want to change their practices?


 
Page 2 of 10 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Remove Ads

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

content

Click on a term to search for related topics.