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  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    676

    My job is killing me

    Seriously.
    I am so sick of it. I want something new, but I am living in a “why’s the man always bringin’ me down” kind of world.
    It is snuffing my creative drive. Job hunting is insane. I know I can do more than what I have done historically, but convincing someone to take a risk on me is hard.
    I know what I am good at and what I can do; it is way more than what I am doing.
    I also have lost interest in living here so I want to find something back on the east coast which makes networking a little harder.
    Have you ever made a career move up and out?
    How did you do it?
    How do you convince someone you are more than your resume says you are?
    How do you find a job out of town?

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  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    brooklyn
    Posts
    600
    With respect to your resume, is there anyone you know that would be willing to read it over and critique it? I took my resume and cover letter to a friend a few years back, and she slashed it to bits. At first it was a little disheartening, but in the long run, she made me look 500 % better on paper... and since that is most employers' first impression of you, it really matters!

  4. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Three Lakes, MI
    Posts
    37
    I agree with elixirbeth, your resume is the key to getting the interview. I also have a portfolio that I keep updated to take with me on interviews. The making of the portfolio has been really helpful for me in creating my resume because it forces you to focus on your accomplishments and strengths. They are also very fun for anyone who enjoys scrapbooking...just a little bonus.
    I also do research on a job before I send my resume so I can do any "tweaking" to make it seem more suited to what they're looking for.
    I've also found that if I portray confidence in myself, others will have confidence in me. I know it sounds cheezy, but when I first graduated from college, I was so nervous at every interview! I had such a hard time finding a job. Once I got comfortable with the process and convinced myself that any company would be lucky to have me as an employee, things really turned around.
    Best of luck!

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    676
    The trouble is not so much the standard guidelines of finding a job.
    I generally have never had a problem finding a job where I live, it is usually a result of networking as much as anything else. It is searching for a job in another state/side of the country that is harder.
    I have had my resume crumbled and rebuilt a few times, and I do tweak it for different jobs.

    The trouble is I think my previous titles are hurting my chances and I am not inclined to lie.

  6. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    brooklyn
    Posts
    600
    I see. When I moved to New York, I used a job placement company. I had offers in a matter of hours. This may be something to consider (many are free to you, but charge the companies that subscribe... since the companies pay, they are inclined to use the service.)

  7. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    206
    I'm going through a similar situation. I'm currently an office gnome and I hate it. I've decided to go into organic farming (which is, needless to say, completely different from anything I've ever done). A couple of things I've done to make this move are highlighting my resume so that it works for what I'm applying for. This may mean tranlating some of your skills-- for example on mine, I highlighted my organization skills, marketing ability, dedication and ability to learn new things quickly and remain adaptable. This got my foot in the door. Then I started talking to everyone I knew (and their colleagues and friends) about organic farming and my interest in it. Now I have a nice list of contacts that I can stay in touch with for job and volunteer opportunites as well as career advice and education. Also, you have to decide whether or not you're going to jump in head first or transition into your new career gradually. I'm doing it gradually, working at the farm on the weekends. Meanwhile, I've negotiated a pay raise at my office gnome job so that it's more worthwhile. So you have to weigh the pros and cons of your situation. And I can't stress enough the importance of the followup-- after an interview, phone call, visit, etc. always email or call with a brief "thanks for your time; I look forward to speaking with you further". It keeps you in their minds and lets them know you have manners and are really interested.

  8. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    atlanta ga
    Posts
    433
    if you need to go, just go.

    honestly, don't get bogged down in the details. When I moved from NYC to ATL, I packed up my car and drove down here, knowing that I had a place to stay until I found work. I had no job, very little money. I gave myself 2 months to find a job, and if not, I would head back to NYC.

    I am still here in atlanta. I don't know if you follow my blog, but I have been through an incredible few months. I just started a new job, have applied to the Peace Corps and will be applying to grad school for Library Science. I am interested in moving to either seattle, portland or BC.

    I have learned that one must take risks in life....things usually have a way of working out. if you worry about it, it will never get done.

  9. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    11
    You just need to find your job which can bring not only money but satisfaction too. For example some people like engineering and creating something new for the industry. Others think about people's health and want to produce very qualitative nutrition for everyone. I mean farming when you work with animals and natural products and create some goods for many people such as milk, meat, vegetables and so on. There are so many useful types of equipment for farming for example milk separators https://merry-farm.com/ and others which can make farming much easier.
    Last edited by MarcusSunny; 09-20-2019 at 10:06 AM.

  10. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    13
    Why don't you want to consider a remote job? You will work from home and can literally go to any town you want.

  11. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    109
    Hi, I found a very cool job on the Internet, by profession. I work as a web designer, and thanks to the job search site.Now I can work at home and customers to send all the work through the Internet. It is very convenient since I am at home and do not go to the office. So I can find work on the Internet.Try this maybe its help you.


 
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