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  1. #1
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    Nov 2004
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    NYC
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    Helpful hints on housework

    We could put those here...

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  3. #2
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2004
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    NYC
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    Outfitting a Kitchen

    No matter how big or small your kitchen might be, there are certain basic items you'll need. You don't have to be a fancy cook either- these are items that can be used with the microwave or mixes. While one doesn't need all of these items to cook a simple meal, having them does make cooking easier. Most of them can be picked up at a thrift shop or garage sale, and having truly retro pieces can add a lot of charm to your kitchen.
    If you are a single person or part of a couple, you might want to halve the number of silverware and plates that are recommended. But if you are every planning on having some friends over for dinner, it's nice to have the extra pieces on hand for entertaining.

    3 rubber spatulas of different sizes
    3 wooden spoons
    a balloon whisk for eggs and sauces
    1 set each of dry and wet measuring cups
    1 set of measuring spoons
    A pepper grinder
    2 Teflon-coated oven mitts
    assorted potholders
    A medium-sized strainer
    assorted dishtowels
    2 wooden cutting boards (one for meat ingredients and one for veggies, if possible)
    containers for flour and sugar (they should hold a minimum of 4 cups each)
    a soapdish and soap for keeping clean in between cooking different items
    a good basic set of knives (bread/tomato knife, paring knife, boning knife, utility knife) and a sharpener or knife steel
    a pair of good sharp scissors
    a set of cutlery for 8 (if you eat meat, you'll need steak knives; otherwise, knife, tea spoon, fork, and possibly soup spoon)
    a set of tableware for 8 (bowl, regular plate, dessert plate, water glass, cup and saucer)
    a decent set of pots and pans, preferably ones that can go from oven to table (1, 2, and 3 quarts, and a large pot for soup)
    containers for leftovers
    freezer bags in various sizes
    ice cube trays
    a kitchen trash bin
    a sponge or dishcloth
    a water kettle and/or a coffee pot
    a hand mixer and two bowls
    At least one plain table cloth and 8 napkins
    a kitchen timer
    an oven thermometer
    storage containers for leftovers
    two cookie sheets
    a can opener
    a large serving platter

    Useful but not necessary:
    a Silpat (silicone baking sheet)
    baking dishes
    pie weights
    kitchen twine for tying roasts and poultry
    2 cake pans
    1 loaf pan
    1 pound cake/bundt pan
    an immersion mixer
    a French press coffee maker
    a coffee/spice grinder
    8 mugs
    a copy of the older version of The Joy of Cooking (it has information on how to cook pretty much anything from scratch and is the next best thing to having a grandmother in the kitchen with you)
    a meat thermometer
    a candy thermometer
    a rolling pin
    a spice cabinet
    a toaster oven
    a blender
    a food processor

    What did I miss?

  4. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    portland oregon!!!
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    328
    a wisk? I use mine for everything from pitchers of drinks to certain batters.

  5. #4
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2004
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    NYC
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    Good- added.

  6. #5
    Senior Member
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    Jun 2004
    Location
    Boston
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    676
    The only helpful hint I have here is to get a house keeper. They are cheeper than you might think and if you hate cleaning as much as I do worth 2x the money.

  7. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    330
    Clean your windows with newspaper. This way you're recycling and it saves money because you use less paper towels.

    When socks wear out too much to be mended cut off the tubular part and use the fabric for general cleaning cloths. While the bottom part of a sock may have holes the tube part of the socks gets less wear.

  8. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    88
    So, you've just moved into your first place and while you know in your head that it's probably clean....you decide to clean it and make it your own.
    But you may be lacking cleaning products. Maybe you're broke and can't afford all those harsh chemical cleaners. What do you do?

    Reach for the baking soda and vinegar!!!! They are cheap and effective cleaners that won't harm the environment or leave nasty "chemical" smells in your place. And if the cats decide to like the water out of the shower, no problem. Baking soda and vinegar are non-toxic.

    However, if you use them together you'll get that 5th grade science experiment reaction where they foam and bubble. Although, that can be useful to help clear out clogged drains too!

  9. #8
    Senior Member
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    Apr 2004
    Location
    belleville, nj
    Posts
    467
    right before you wash your dishes, put your sponge (soaked with cold water) into the microwave on high for one minute. this sanitizes your sponge. be careful when you take it out. it is HOT!

  10. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Chi-Town!
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    42
    anthrogirl, do you think it's necessary to clarify that there are liquid and dry measuring cups? I know I personally can't stand trying to measure water in a dry measure.

    I also, personally, would recommend two sets of measuring spoons, because sometimes you need a tsp of a liquid or shortening (sticky) and two or more tsp of dry ingredients to be added *after* the liquid. It's kind of a pain to break your groove to clean an item as you're working, though it's certainly possible.

    Plus then you have a back-up for when one spoon in a set goes missing, but that may just be my house.

    For food safety reasons, it's useful to have two different types of cutting boards, so the meat board and the "to be eaten raw" board are quickly visually distinguished. I have different plastic boards, though I have heard that wooden boards actually tend to harbor fewer microorganisms over time. I prefer wood in general, but gifts are gifts and useful gifts are great!

  11. #10
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2004
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    NYC
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    Quote Originally Posted by riotous lioness
    anthrogirl, do you think it's necessary to clarify that there are liquid and dry measuring cups? I know I personally can't stand trying to measure water in a dry measure.

    I also, personally, would recommend two sets of measuring spoons, because sometimes you need a tsp of a liquid or shortening (sticky) and two or more tsp of dry ingredients to be added *after* the liquid. It's kind of a pain to break your groove to clean an item as you're working, though it's certainly possible.

    Plus then you have a back-up for when one spoon in a set goes missing, but that may just be my house.

    For food safety reasons, it's useful to have two different types of cutting boards, so the meat board and the "to be eaten raw" board are quickly visually distinguished. I have different plastic boards, though I have heard that wooden boards actually tend to harbor fewer microorganisms over time. I prefer wood in general, but gifts are gifts and useful gifts are great!
    Yeah, I think so. Especially for new cooks, people need to know the difference between the two. I can attest that after spending Thanksgiving at my mom's place- I couldn't find a dry measure anywhere and I nearly went insane.

    I agree on the spoons also. As for boards, it turns out wood is the best- wood actually has chemicals in it that kills food bacteria! Plastic is most likely to keep food bacteria alive. I'll make the changes accordingly.


 
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