Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    438

    Helpful hints on crafting

    We could put those here...

  2. # ADS

  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    438
    The Silpat is not only great for cooking. You can actually use it for messy craft projects. It's a sheet of silicon with wire in it, and you can use it to protect your surfaces. Most importantly, it's almost impossible to permanently stick anything to it. Everything either flakes or washes right off.

  4. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    2,021
    Did you accidentally iron the wrong side of the fusible interfacing, and get gunk on your iron? I've done that more than once, myself!

    Open up a section of a newspaper so you have a big piece a few sheets thick, and put a handful of salt in the middle. With the iron on a medium dry setting, iron back and forth over the salt in all directions. If the salt gets too spread out, shake it back to the center and keep ironing until all the sticky goo is off. Use a dry towel to brush off as much loose salt as you can, then go to a steam setting and iron back and forth on the towel while blasting steam to get rid of any clinging salt.

    You probably wouldn't want to do this if your iron has a teflon plate, but for other irons, it works great to get melted plastic or other gunk off the plate, and you don't even have to wait for the iron to cool.

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    106
    When I'm sewing, I always end up with little bits and pieces of thread. Most of the time they wind up on the floor, even when I try to throw them into the little trash can by my sewing area (funny how they just manage to float out of there). Anyway, to combat this problem, I take a plastic container (a recycled margarine or whipped topping tub work well, you want it to be a little flexible) and cut a small X in the center of the lid. When I have little leftover thread pieces I can just push them through the X. That way they all end up in the same place until I'm ready to toss them out. I've also heard of people throwing the little thread bits out in their gardens so that birds can use them to build their nests.

  6. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    438
    When I have leftover pieces of yarn that are more than a foot long, I save them for smaller projects. I've used them to put edging on gloves, to make cell phone holders, and for the really long bulky pieces, I'm saving them to make a rug. I a;so use them to embroider small items; I also sometimes crochet them up into flowers.

  7. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Liberty, MO
    Posts
    57

    thread alternative

    When I'm in a pinch and need thicker than normal thread, I use floss!! It's durable and you can get it from the dentist for free!


 

Remove Ads

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Helpful hints on housework
    By anthrogirl in forum GetCrafty Community Book
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 08-07-2018, 08:10 AM
  2. LA Crafting
    By quornflour in forum Craft-Up
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-09-2007, 09:48 PM
  3. any paper mache hints?
    By Victoria Grice in forum Share A Craft
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-06-2005, 02:04 PM
  4. helpful household tips?
    By sarabell in forum Domestic Bliss
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-24-2005, 10:20 PM
  5. Some Helpful Cheer for Friend
    By SheIsMe! in forum Freestyle
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-16-2005, 08:28 PM

Search tags for this page

helpful hints for crafting

Click on a term to search for related topics.