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  1. #1
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    tie-dyeing today, inspired by prada

    ladies,

    i'm about to go tie dye some articles, inspired by the lovely muccia prada and her brilliant collection this season. i'll try to upload the finished products before we take off for italy...but anyone have advice?

    i'm only using two colors at a time, to keep it really simple and chic. and isntead of 70's style, hippy clothes (which I LOVE by the way), i'm using more tailored sutff: a collared shirt and a sweat shirt. i wanted to do a cartigan, but didn't find anyhting at the sally ally and i'm running out of time. last year i did a bunch of men's wife-beaters and they came out great.

    jean

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  3. #2
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    I LOVE tyedye,maybe you could post a photo?

  4. #3
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    I am not familiar with her collection. And a brief search came up with handbags and not fabric or clothing.

    In fabric stores we are selling some batiked fabric and some tie dyed fabrics that are not really either. Some of the batiked are probably salt and ice dyed and some of the tie dyed are stamped. Some sheers are watered or maybe ombre'd with color gradations that are much more gradual than tie dye or batik.

    Can you describe what it looks like? All of that stuff I mentioned is doable at home.

  5. #4
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    check out: http://www.prada.com/ or http://www.style.com/fashionshows/co...editor/101803/ (scroll down and click on prada.)




  6. #5
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    May 2004
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    Prada

    Hello-
    I made a "Prada-esque" duvet cover--her spring collection is amazing. I've noticed that she used a great deal of ruffled netting-very soft and very minimal--as a trim on skirt hems, etc. The spring colors were grayish pastels and browns. It reminded me of torn vintage gowns from the 30's. Tattered almost, yet completely original, very deliberate. With the duvet cover I washed pale green taffeta until it was very faint, then I bordered it with a pleated beige raw silk (shantung). I bordered it again with pin tucked pale yellow silk, then pale lavender cotton (which I dip- dyed in watered down brown dye) and then at the hem: a thin band of ruffled taupe netting. I feel like a silent film star under that duvet!!!

    In terms of dyeing, I picked one color and stuck with it. I twisted fabric into a rope and placed rubber bands near the hem. I then dipped it--the bottom edge became saturated with dye, while it was fainter at the upper edge. Try dipping it high once, then lower, then lower, then lower.

    Dip dying in a color release (Rit) acheives a great effect as well, without destroying the fabric as much as bleach would.

    Certainly not a Dead-Head look. Limited palette and RESTRAINT was used with the dye design--mostly straight lines. Nothing "groovy"

    When I gazed at the Prada boutique display window here in Chicago, it was the first time I ever regretted not being filthy rich. C'est la vie.

    Money is NOT the only resource!!


    good luck![/color][/color]

  7. #6
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    I wouldn't of ever thought to tie dye a cardigan but it looked amazing on the style.com site. Definitely let us know how your experiments turn out!

  8. #7
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    Not much to add here, but a ditto for Caleche's advice!

    A few years ago, I dip-dyed a piece of unbleached muslin for a shower curtain. I used a method very similar to what Caleche described (I would love to see pictures of the duvet cover!) I used *one* color: a deep rusty orange. I did not use RIT, but a cold water dye. In my experience, these dyes persevere more than hot water types, but if I were to dye a piece of clothing I would hand wash it in cold water forever more anyhow.

    I mixed the dye in a small plastic trash bin and dipped the hemmed muslin (I did not twist it first, if I recall correctly), letting the rest of fabric drape over the top of the bin and anchor it. I waited 10 minutes and then dipped it deeper and then again (to get the graduated color effect).

    I also *love* the graduated grey-greens from the Prada links! It brings to mind something like ghostly elegance. Very Miss Havisham.

  9. #8
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    Yeah, caleche is right. There is a little bit of tie dye and a lot of bit of dip dying in the Prada stuff.

    Go with higher end dyes like Dylon and you will be happier. The Rit colors, while fun, can fade too easily.

    That black and red dress was tied at the waist and a few inches above the hem with very tight bands. Might have been elastics, but you have to cover the areas you want white. The red hem was probably not only kept out of the black dye bath, but covered very tightly to prevent the darker color from seeping in. Once the black dried, the red hem was dipped, just up to the white band, still wrapped tightly. For the moment I am believing it was dyed after being sewn, but you could certainly do it before cutting up the plain material according to a pattern.

    On one of the links, there was an earthtone skirt heading up to a darker top. That was probably done in a similar way, but with less attention to rubberbanding for white areas. The loose folds of the skirt may have been dipped then rinsed quickly to mottle the coloring. Salt can do that but not to the extent it appeared on that dress.

  10. #9
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    hi, new poster here

    i want to dye a cardigan in the prada style, but i'm confused about what kind of fabrics are dyable. what should i look for in terms of fabric content?

    thanks

  11. #10
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    Three things from my perspective:

    All natural single fiber content. Blends in knitted fibers may get a heather look to them, with some fibers taking up more of the dye. Natural fibers usually take to dying better with cleaner colors, but you can dye synthetics if you follow package instructions and are prepared for it not turning out exactly as you expected.

    New material/clothing, rather than old. Old stuff will have stains and wear you might not even see. Those areas can either repel or attract more dye.

    If you are planning on doing the nondyed stripes as in the red and black dress, pick a close knit sweater rather than a loose weave or knit. You'll have to compact the fibers with the tying off and a looser knit may allow more color in than you wanted.


 
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